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February 27 2014

09:00

February 25 2014

10:00

February 24 2014

14:00

February 21 2014

19:00

February 20 2014

12:00
04:00

February 17 2014

23:15
11:00

February 11 2014

02:00

Adjustable Forms / DLR Group

Architects: DLR Group
Location: 1 East Progress Road, Lombard, IL 60148, USA
Architect In Charge: Nathan Casteel
Area: 20145.0 ft2
Year: 2013
Photographs: James Steinkamp

Interior Designer: Whitney Architects, Jessie James
General Contractor: James and Eric Lindquist
Landscape Architect: Ecology Vision, LLC Andy Stahr
Mep, Structural, Civil Engineer: W-T Engineering

From the architect. Adjustable Forms Inc., established as one of the most respected and advanced cast-in-place concrete construction firms in the country, had outgrown their current facility located in Lombard, IL.  They sought out to renovate and expand upon their current office and warehouse functions and had a desire to provide an aesthetic that was a reflection upon their work.  The design team conceived the project as a vehicle to showcase the client’s talents and capabilities while expanding their own knowledge of concrete and its potential.

The project is comprised of an expansion and renovation of the existing office and warehouse facility.  The 8,000sqft office features an office suite, an employee lounge, a collaboration area, a specialized BIM room, a reception area and a trellised courtyard while the 12,145sqft warehouse provides ample space for equipment storage, a manager’s office and a mechanical shop.  

The design focused on reusing the existing building’s elements where possible. Reused elements consist of structural piles, foundations, steel joists, columns, roof deck, and brick masonry walls.  The existing concrete slabs were crushed and repurposed as granular fill material for new floor systems.  The project is registered with the USGBC and is tracking LEED Gold certification. 

The building design is a reflection of concrete as a material and a process.  Several methods of concrete construction are used to showcase the owner’s technical ability; including post-tensioning roof and floor slabs, full height thermally broken and insulated sandwich walls, form liner and board formed textured walls, integrally colored stamped and polished concrete flooring, and traditional reinforced concrete.  Color, texture, and concrete mix were explored and experimented with throughout the design process. 

The concrete mix for the exterior concrete contains a 40% slag mix.  Several different form liner textures and true wood planks are used to achieve various levels of finish.  The wood textures draw on the history of traditional methods of casting concrete.  Reinforcing elements are revealed in the form of a post-tension cable system that serves as a visible trellis system and a security wall application separating public and private. 

The design limited the materials used to provide a pure minimalist aesthetic.  A high performance rain screen system and solid panel system made of black zinc were used to bring a sophisticated contrast to the stark minimalist light colored concrete massing.  On the interior, day-lighting is optimized with skylights and continuous glazing around the perimeter. LED lighting and radiant flooring are used throughout to maximize energy-efficiency.  

The perforated zinc panel sun screen system is used to mitigate the harsh western sun in the late afternoons while providing a changing aesthetic as the sun moves across the sky.  Building signage is incorporated behind the perforated screen and has a playful dialogue as the transparency of the screen changes from day to night.  The zinc panel is an abstract representation of the form work being lifted from the concrete mass, what builders call “stripping the forms”. 

Adjustable Forms / DLR Group © James Steinkamp Adjustable Forms / DLR Group © James Steinkamp Adjustable Forms / DLR Group © James Steinkamp Adjustable Forms / DLR Group © James Steinkamp Adjustable Forms / DLR Group © James Steinkamp Adjustable Forms / DLR Group © James Steinkamp Adjustable Forms / DLR Group © James Steinkamp Adjustable Forms / DLR Group © James Steinkamp Adjustable Forms / DLR Group © James Steinkamp Adjustable Forms / DLR Group © James Steinkamp Adjustable Forms / DLR Group © James Steinkamp Adjustable Forms / DLR Group © James Steinkamp Adjustable Forms / DLR Group © James Steinkamp Adjustable Forms / DLR Group © James Steinkamp Adjustable Forms / DLR Group © James Steinkamp Adjustable Forms / DLR Group © James Steinkamp Adjustable Forms / DLR Group Floor Plan Adjustable Forms / DLR Group Diagram 1 Adjustable Forms / DLR Group Diagram 2 Adjustable Forms / DLR Group Diagram 3 Adjustable Forms / DLR Group Detail

February 09 2014

06:00

Office & House Luna / Hitzig Militello arquitectos

Architects: Hitzig Militello arquitectos
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
Area: 250 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Federico Kulekdjian

Construction: Fernando Hitzig & Leonardo G. Militello Luis Acosta
Collaborators: Florencia Schvartzman, Belén Lepro Delelis
Structural Advisor: Carlos Gandini

From the architect. The project is located in the southern part of the city of Buenos Aires, precisely in Parque Patricios, a neighborhood that is being promoted as a technological pole. This characteristic motivated the client to start the construction of a building that unfolds into two separate volumes, his home and an office for his business. Both buildings have in common constructive and material decisions, however they show a strong formal contrast. In addition, the two volumes meet sustainable conditions: ventilated facades, reuse of rainwater and FCS certified wood (OSB).

The office provides certain dynamics in materials and forms, the heterogeneity of materials underlies in the homogeneity of its dark shades of color. The dynamics of the facade, result  of a formal operation, seeks to achieve a functional simplicity at the entrance while generating visuals towards its neighbors, rather lower buildings. The facade includes a palette of two materials, zinc metal and brick, trimmed as if one is the other’s negative.

On the contrary, in the volume of the family house, the operation is simple and powerful. It is a concrete volume without intermediate structure, achieving free visuals across the entire lot. This structural effort brings about a certain ingravity of its component parts. This is reflected in elements such the staircase and balcony, both suspended. The curved and solid wall of the facade (inner courtyard facade), built in a dark common type of brick, opposes to the glazed facade (back garden).

Ultimately, the project shows a volumetric contrast, result of two very different uses. In spite of that, the project reaches a balanced dialog between tones and materials that sews both buildings together.

Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos © Federico Kulekdjian Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos © Federico Kulekdjian Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos © Federico Kulekdjian Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos © Federico Kulekdjian Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos © Federico Kulekdjian Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos © Federico Kulekdjian Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos © Federico Kulekdjian Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos © Federico Kulekdjian Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos © Federico Kulekdjian Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos © Federico Kulekdjian Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos © Federico Kulekdjian Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos © Federico Kulekdjian Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos © Federico Kulekdjian Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos © Federico Kulekdjian Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos © Federico Kulekdjian Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos © Federico Kulekdjian Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos © Federico Kulekdjian Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos © Federico Kulekdjian Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos © Federico Kulekdjian Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos © Federico Kulekdjian Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos © Federico Kulekdjian Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos Ground Floor Plan Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos Superior Floor Plan Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos Roof Floor Plan Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos Elevation Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos Section A-A Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos Section B-B Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos Section C-C Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos Section D-D Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos Section E-E Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos Section F-F Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos Diagram Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos Detail 1 Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos Detail 2 Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos Detail 3 Office & House Luna  / Hitzig Militello arquitectos Detail 4

February 07 2014

20:00

A917 Corporate Headquarters In Pisa / nuvolaB architetti associati

Architects: nuvolaB architetti associati
Location: Via San Frediano, Pisa, Italy
Architect In Charge: Nicola Lariccia
Area: 135 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Courtesy of nuvolaB architetti associati

From the architect. The computer company 3logic reorganizes its headquarters in the heart of the historic center of Pisa, recovering the space of the old rectory in the church of San Frediano.

The historical conditions of the ambiance didn’t allow to modify the existing space, thus the new office is entirely designed around a large furniture unit in which the main required functions are located : an archive, a small lab, equipped walls and shelves.

Most of the working stations find place on a mezzanine created on the top of the main unit. A wide staircase gives access to this area, acting also as an informal place to sit and have a break during the day.

Three big tables on wheels can be pulled out of the main unit in order to add further working spaces on the lower floor, according to the needs of the moment, and bringing an extreme flexibility to the room.

This core becomes a unique architectural element, which follows the visitor from the entrance to the meeting room. As you enter the space, the furniture unit also hosts the front desk, which includes a small kitchen corner, and hides the toilets.

A917 Corporate Headquarters In Pisa / nuvolaB architetti associati Courtesy of nuvolaB architetti associati A917 Corporate Headquarters In Pisa / nuvolaB architetti associati Courtesy of nuvolaB architetti associati A917 Corporate Headquarters In Pisa / nuvolaB architetti associati Courtesy of nuvolaB architetti associati A917 Corporate Headquarters In Pisa / nuvolaB architetti associati Courtesy of nuvolaB architetti associati A917 Corporate Headquarters In Pisa / nuvolaB architetti associati Courtesy of nuvolaB architetti associati A917 Corporate Headquarters In Pisa / nuvolaB architetti associati Courtesy of nuvolaB architetti associati A917 Corporate Headquarters In Pisa / nuvolaB architetti associati Courtesy of nuvolaB architetti associati A917 Corporate Headquarters In Pisa / nuvolaB architetti associati Courtesy of nuvolaB architetti associati A917 Corporate Headquarters In Pisa / nuvolaB architetti associati Courtesy of nuvolaB architetti associati A917 Corporate Headquarters In Pisa / nuvolaB architetti associati Courtesy of nuvolaB architetti associati A917 Corporate Headquarters In Pisa / nuvolaB architetti associati Courtesy of nuvolaB architetti associati A917 Corporate Headquarters In Pisa / nuvolaB architetti associati Courtesy of nuvolaB architetti associati A917 Corporate Headquarters In Pisa / nuvolaB architetti associati Courtesy of nuvolaB architetti associati A917 Corporate Headquarters In Pisa / nuvolaB architetti associati Courtesy of nuvolaB architetti associati A917 Corporate Headquarters In Pisa / nuvolaB architetti associati Courtesy of nuvolaB architetti associati A917 Corporate Headquarters In Pisa / nuvolaB architetti associati Floor Plan A917 Corporate Headquarters In Pisa / nuvolaB architetti associati Cross Section A917 Corporate Headquarters In Pisa / nuvolaB architetti associati Transversal Section A917 Corporate Headquarters In Pisa / nuvolaB architetti associati Isometric

February 06 2014

00:00

TADAH Office / TADAH Collaboration

Architects: TADAH Collaboration
Location: Pathum Wan, Bangkok, Thailand
Area: 1,620 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Courtesy of TADAH Collaboration

From the architect. We observe that each individual has different preference in working behavior. A discrepancy of benefits on one topology may constrain the creativity to utilize a single space. Especially, when we designed our own office with a restricted area of 1,620 sq.ft. (151.sq.m.) filled with young designers whom to be nurtured and inspired. Our solution is to create an office without any assigned work station – everyone moves around and works wherever inspire them within the premise. A flexibility to transform specific space into a friendly mix-used environment with less interruption to ongoing activities is our key objective. The layout is purposely bound to compliment various dynamic use of every square foot occupied.

Our implication is driven by a sensible opposition of how the contrary components are interrelated and interdependent. Four distinct zones signaled by paradoxical tones; super bright (pantry/gallery), super dark (meeting room), natural light ‘colorless’ (workstation), and deep charcoal (library) is to accentuate physical manifestation of possible habitual usage. To rethink how limited space can be fully utilized in a multipurpose function while eliminating the wasteful ‘inactivated period’ of the meeting room, we place the meeting room at the center and make its wall operable in different series with intention to ease the flow and to bridge all zones seamlessly supported by an easily detachable meeting room table. We mindfully design all our furniture with material selection delicacy to achieve the perfect mobility, harmony, and to the fullest functionality, i.e. by adjusting the coffee tables’ height, it transforms a cozy area into a full stream work space.

The pantry/gallery ceiling is paneled with slight undulated reflective acrylic sheets, not only to amplify its height, but also to echo the streamlined reality into a trivial impression. The lighting panels in the meeting room replicate the simple lines of reversed roof geometry with strings of backlit-LED to offer an introspective and gentle atmosphere to better suit each activity conducted. The sense of mythical, the obscure filing shelves, lockers, and material cabinet are transfused behind mirror walls. To soften the office mood, we shift glazing-aluminum mullions to timber fin framing a greater depth of city skyline as an oversized artwork. Bangkok’s serenity has effortlessly blessed the interior charismatic charm.  From the space arrangements to all office details, we believe that they will establish unique ambience in each perspective, time, and occasion, together with being a significant part in bringing designer’s creative inspiration to live.

TADAH Office / TADAH Collaboration Courtesy of TADAH Collaboration TADAH Office / TADAH Collaboration Courtesy of TADAH Collaboration TADAH Office / TADAH Collaboration Courtesy of TADAH Collaboration TADAH Office / TADAH Collaboration Courtesy of TADAH Collaboration TADAH Office / TADAH Collaboration Courtesy of TADAH Collaboration TADAH Office / TADAH Collaboration Courtesy of TADAH Collaboration TADAH Office / TADAH Collaboration Courtesy of TADAH Collaboration TADAH Office / TADAH Collaboration Courtesy of TADAH Collaboration TADAH Office / TADAH Collaboration Courtesy of TADAH Collaboration TADAH Office / TADAH Collaboration Courtesy of TADAH Collaboration TADAH Office / TADAH Collaboration Courtesy of TADAH Collaboration TADAH Office / TADAH Collaboration Courtesy of TADAH Collaboration TADAH Office / TADAH Collaboration Courtesy of TADAH Collaboration TADAH Office / TADAH Collaboration Courtesy of TADAH Collaboration TADAH Office / TADAH Collaboration Courtesy of TADAH Collaboration TADAH Office / TADAH Collaboration Floor Plan TADAH Office / TADAH Collaboration Diagram

January 27 2014

20:00

Soil Centre Copenhagen / Christensen & Co

Architects: Christensen & Co
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
Area: 1,800 sqm
Photographs: Adam Mørk

Engineer: Grontmij
General Contractor: CPH City & Port Development

User: Copenhagen Municipality. The Technical and Environmental Administration

From the architect. Between the sky and the ocean

On the edge of Øresund, where the sky meets he ocean behind the Freeport and the Container Terminal lies Copenhagen Municipality’s new soil treatment centre, Soil Centre Copenhagen. It is here millions of cubic metres of dug up soil from construction projects and metro building sites around Copenhagen create new ground for Copenhagen´s new urban area Nordhavn.

The centre employees analyse and handle the contaminated soil, making sure that it is used in an environmentally safe manner. The landscape at Nordhavn is flat and makes for a fascinating and ever changing scenery, giant piles of soil and huge excavations. More than anything, it looks like a rough lunar landscape with left-over building materials and rusty metal parts. To the Northwest of Soil Centre Copenhagen the landscape is contrastingly lush with little green hills, shrubbery and little ponds and lakes fringed with rushes. A wild nature site filled with sounds from birds, swans and mewing seagulls.

It is also here the protected European Green Toad, has made a new home for itself. This has led to a decision to always preserve the area the way it is. With this very unique context Soil Centre Copenhagen grows out of the landscape with its characteristic shape and rusty red facades. The building has a distinctive silhouette against the vast horizon, and the building is simultaneously an integrated part of the landscape and an obviously man-made object.

Completely different spaces in one sculptural form

The sculptural building makes for a protecting boundary between areas trafficked by heavy machinery and the protected nature site, and with its zigzagging shape the building creates spaces that face either towards the soil arrival area or the nature site. The facades are clad in stretch metal made from rusty weathering steel. On the roof tall grass and, in time, even smallish bushes and trees will grow. In this sense the building makes up for the piece of the landscape it has occupied, and will help preserve the natural biodiversity of the area. The weathering steel is protected by a red layer of rust, visually connecting it to the area and the ambitious environmental profile of the building.  It offers, besides the beautiful red colour, a robust surface that can withstand the dust and dirt in this harsh environment.

The centre consists of a series of very different spaces and functions, and the shape of the building arose from the particular need for height and spaciousness. The building consists of an office section for employees, laboratories, dressing rooms, two large workshops, garages and storage spaces. At the centre of the building the office section makes for a peaceful oasis with a view of the surroundings through the carefully placed windows, each offering beautifully framed views of the landscape or the waters of Øresund. At the same time, placement of the windows in the facade optimises the use of natural light, so the character and quality of that light becomes an integrated part of the architectural narrative.

A green and luxuriant interior

When you step in through the main entrance you can see right through the building to the nature site behind it. Two large indoor trees, along with the lush plant wall, create a green and delightful internal contrast to the dusty and rough exterior environment. Dressing rooms, laboratories and the office section are all situated in one interior element that almost resembles a huge piece of furniture sitting between the tall concrete walls.

The office section is on the first floor, while dressing rooms and laboratories are on the ground floor. The large number of roof windows shower the building with a pleasant light from above, and along with the facade windows, allows for some very good natural light conditions in the office section. The floor plan encourages interdisciplinary synergy between the centre’s very different departments ranging from engineers to excavator drivers. The materials in the interior are dominated by the raw concrete of the outer walls, walls and fixtures made of plywood, and floors made from bedding mortar. 

The first DGNB certified building in Nordhavn

KMC Nordhavn is the first DGNB certified building in Denmark built after the test phase has ended and the very first certified building in Nordhavn. It is a zero energy building, which combines passive and active energy efficiency measures based on an overall view, which encompasses energy efficiency, building materials and social aspects.

The design of the building results in an extremely low energy consumption and the necessary energy is provided using geothermal energy from the many kilometres of piping underneath the black asphalt in front of the building as well as solar panels and solar cells integrated into the slanting roof surfaces.

Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co © Adam Mørk Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co © Adam Mørk Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co © Adam Mørk Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co © Adam Mørk Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co © Adam Mørk Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co © Adam Mørk Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co © Adam Mørk Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co © Adam Mørk Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co © Adam Mørk Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co © Adam Mørk Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co © Adam Mørk Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co © Adam Mørk Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co © Adam Mørk Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co © Adam Mørk Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co © Adam Mørk Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co © Adam Mørk Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co © Adam Mørk Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co © Adam Mørk Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co © Adam Mørk Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co Site Plan Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co Ground Floor Plan Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co First Floor Plan Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co Section Soil Centre Copenhagen  / Christensen & Co Concept

January 26 2014

17:00

NBBJ Designs Towering Shenzhen Campus for Internet Giant

NBBJ has unveiled a 250-meter-high, two-tower campus that will become Tencent’s main headquarters at the Shenzhen High-Tech Industrial Park upon completion in 2016. As the world’s third-largest internet corporation, and 2013’s most innovative Chinese company according to FastCo, Tencent hopes the new campus will serve as a vibrant workplace for an expanding workforce of 12,000 employees.

With two towers, ranging from 192- to 250-meters high, the campus will be connected by three sky bridges to “activate movement and exchange within the workplace.”

Each bridge will be designed to support its own unique theme. For example, the highest bridge, suspended nearly 180-meters above the tech district, will be centered around a theme of “knowledge” and feature libraries, conference rooms and other amenities that support learning. The second highest connection will revolve around the theme of “health,” providing basketball courts, swimming pools and other fitness programs to employees. In contrast, the third bridge will serve as an extension to the building’s plinth.

“Energy strategies reduce consumption and carbon emissions by 40% over a typical office tower,” described NBBJ. “In addition, the slight rotation of the towers and their offset heights capture the site’s prevailing winds, ventilating the atria while minimizing exposure to direct sun. To control glare and heat-gain, the curtain wall incorporates a modular shading system that varies according to the degree of sun exposure.”

Architects: NBBJ
Design Collaboration: CCDI
Area: 270000.0 sqm
Year: 2016
Photographs: NBBJ

Click here to view the embedded video.

NBBJ Designs Towering Shenzhen Campus for Internet Giant © NBBJ NBBJ Designs Towering Shenzhen Campus for Internet Giant © NBBJ NBBJ Designs Towering Shenzhen Campus for Internet Giant © NBBJ NBBJ Designs Towering Shenzhen Campus for Internet Giant © NBBJ NBBJ Designs Towering Shenzhen Campus for Internet Giant © NBBJ NBBJ Designs Towering Shenzhen Campus for Internet Giant © NBBJ NBBJ Designs Towering Shenzhen Campus for Internet Giant © NBBJ NBBJ Designs Towering Shenzhen Campus for Internet Giant © NBBJ

January 25 2014

10:00

Cisco Offices / Studio O+A

Architects: Studio O+A
Location: San Francisco, CA, USA
Project Team: Primo Orpilla, Denise Cherry, Perry Stephney, Clem Soga, Steve Gerten, Elizabeth Guerrero, Chase Lunt, Alma Lopez, Caren Currie, Sarunya Wongjodsri, Justin Ackerman, David Hunter, Jeorge Jordan, Olivia Ward, Kroeun Dav, Chase Lunt, Amie Zemlicka, Alex Bautista, Maleesa Pollock, Will Chu,
Area: 110000.0 ft2
Year: 2013
Photographs: Jasper Sanidad

Contractor : Principal Builders
Permit Consultants: A.R. Sanchez-­‐Corea & Associates
Mep Consultants: MEP Consultants:
Leed Consultants: Beryline
Kitchen Consultants: RAS Design
Structural Engineers: Pannu, Larsen & McCartney
Client: Cisco-­‐Meraki
Software Used: AutoCAD, 3D Studio Max, Adobe Creative Suite

From the architect. The panoramic view of San Francisco’s water front from Cisco-­‐Meraki’s new offices in some ways setsthe theme for O+A’s design. Viewed from almost any angle, the interiors create an impression of light, spaciousness, bright color, long sightlines. Meraki, which was recently acquired by Cisco Systems, takes pride in the elegance of the wireless routers itdesigns. O+A sought to build the space the way Meraki builds its products, with an emphasis on simplicity and seamless ease of use, while remaining mindful of the importance of the Cisco-­‐Meraki merger to the company’s identity. Located in the rapidly changing Mission Bay neighborhood, Cisco-­‐Meraki’s 110,000-­‐square-­‐footsuite of offices now becomes Cisco’s principal San Francisco location.

At the outset, O+A surveyed Meraki’s employees to find out what they liked about their old, much smaller headquarters. A consensus emerged for natural light, plenty of collaboration space, and preservation of thecompany’stightly knit culture. The size of the new space and the prominence of its floor-­‐to-­‐ceiling windows made collaboration and natural light relatively easy to incorporate. O+A’sdesign offers a variety of meeting spaces—formal and informal, indoor and outdoor—many of them bathed in the crystal line light of San Francisco Bay. The scale and the light support a rich palette of colors and design elements: a wide staircase with integrated stadium seating at its base, a meeting room with hanging tillandsia plants, and an outdoor deck offering views of the baseball park and Bay Bridge.

Main taining Meraki’s cozy ambience in the hangar-­‐sized complex proved more challenging. O+A’ssolution was to create a medley of small gathering spaces within the large footprint. Sunken seatingbrings intimacy to horizontal common areas while preserving broad sightlines. Yurts, cabanas, and phone rooms offer varying levels of enclosure. Throughout the office, colleagues can sit down and talk in informal lounge spaces.

Despite the rich finishes and the wide array of typologies, one of O+A’s goals was to give Cisco-­‐Meraki employees a blank canvas on which to paint their own pictures. In lieu of pervasive branding graphics, O+A provided ubiquitous chalkboards, whiteboards, and corkboards so that employees could sketch, write, and pin-­‐up graphics meaning ful to them. As might be expected, given the company’s strong do-­‐it-­‐yourself culture, mobility and adaptability were big factors in the selection of furniture and work stations. These are people who like to move things around.

The intention was to tame the big space and make it human. Watching Meraki employees travel from department to department via unicycle, gather for lunch on the breezy deck, or make use of the yurtsand wall “pop-­‐ins” throughout the day, we believe that goal was achieved.

Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A © Jasper Sanidad Cisco Offices / Studio O+A Fourth Floor Plan Cisco Offices / Studio O+A Fifth Floor Plan

January 21 2014

18:00

CETICOM Jaén / ER Arquitectos + non Arquitectura

Architects: ER Arquitectos , non Arquitectura
Location: Calle Pintor Fausto Olivares, Polígono Industrial los Rosales, 23009 Jaén, Spain
Er Arquitectos Team: Antonio Estepa Rubio, Jesús Estepa Rubio
Non Arquitectura Team: Alfonso Mollinedo Sáenz, Esperanza Lozano Fernández
Technical Architects: Pedro Antonio Toledano Paulano, Antonio Ramón Maldonado
Project Year: 2013
Photography: Jesús Granada

Client: Cámara Oficial de Comercio e Industria de Jaén
Construction: OMAR S.L.

From the architect. Our proposal for the CETICOM building is organized according to a position, almost like a manifesto, of building and city.

The temporary situation and the place in which it is proposed are significantly important for the city of Jaén and may represent the construction of a unique moment in the city.

We are in a “no man’s land”, a transition zone between the northern residential expansion and the consolidated industrial area of Olivares, which has no built references. This transitional nature of the site is what gives the uniqueness that characterizes this competition and gives the Chamber of Commerce of Jaén an opportunity to establish a relationship of urban service which in our proposal acquires a strong offeror spirit.

We propose a project that meets the specified program, and serves as a seed for what may be the conformation of this “no man’s land”, to turn it into a piece of attractive city with a great urban and environmental quality.

We thus present a proposal that, although limited to the physical boundaries of the site intended to accommodate the CETICOM, aims to look up and exercise a blatant, positive influence on the environment, posing a genuinely useful contribution to the environment and the quality of life of the people, a constructive grain of sand for this utopia that we call city.

It has basically been talking, how we have drawn our proposal, because we believe that collective work emerges as environment capable of producing novelties, trying to figure out at what point the vital and spatial experience acquires its ideal balance with the comfort and satisfaction of needs so as not to add anything more.

We propose sustainability against the increasingly artificial culture of it, as another instrument of the project.

The absurd justification for all kinds of complexities in the name of sustainability is far from its principle. We understand that the first sustainability is precisely the most passive, that which is measured by waivers and reductions of variables, which turns buildings into elements in dialogue with the medium, versus the traditional resistance to its aggression.

We want to do the simplest things, even not do or undo as Cedric Price proposed in his “Non Plan”.

We propose a construction that, through the artificial transformation of a new nature, does not distinguish between good (trees, animals, landscapes …) and bad (cities, cars, people …). And that will be a different architecture because it will appropriate powers not considered until today such as breathing, beating, aging, or disappearing with wisdom, always from the project.

We propose an autonomous building, compact, and easy to maintain, which relates us man and  city, activity and use, through a garden extension. We thus achieve a live space, healthy and enriching human activity. We propose an open and integrated space that encourages motivation and productivity.

A building that is integrated into an orchard and generates a new positive environment for humans.

CETICOM Jaén / ER Arquitectos   + non Arquitectura © Jesús Granada CETICOM Jaén / ER Arquitectos   + non Arquitectura © Jesús Granada CETICOM Jaén / ER Arquitectos   + non Arquitectura © Jesús Granada CETICOM Jaén / ER Arquitectos   + non Arquitectura © Jesús Granada CETICOM Jaén / ER Arquitectos   + non Arquitectura © Jesús Granada CETICOM Jaén / ER Arquitectos   + non Arquitectura © Jesús Granada CETICOM Jaén / ER Arquitectos   + non Arquitectura © Jesús Granada CETICOM Jaén / ER Arquitectos   + non Arquitectura © Jesús Granada CETICOM Jaén / ER Arquitectos   + non Arquitectura © Jesús Granada CETICOM Jaén / ER Arquitectos   + non Arquitectura © Jesús Granada CETICOM Jaén / ER Arquitectos   + non Arquitectura © Jesús Granada CETICOM Jaén / ER Arquitectos   + non Arquitectura © Jesús Granada CETICOM Jaén / ER Arquitectos   + non Arquitectura © Jesús Granada CETICOM Jaén / ER Arquitectos   + non Arquitectura © Jesús Granada CETICOM Jaén / ER Arquitectos   + non Arquitectura © Jesús Granada CETICOM Jaén / ER Arquitectos   + non Arquitectura Architecture Plans CETICOM Jaén / ER Arquitectos   + non Arquitectura Semi-basement Plan, South Elevation CETICOM Jaén / ER Arquitectos   + non Arquitectura Ground Floor Plan, North Elevation CETICOM Jaén / ER Arquitectos   + non Arquitectura Sections CETICOM Jaén / ER Arquitectos   + non Arquitectura Section Detail

January 20 2014

00:00

355 11th Street / Aidlin Darling Design

Architects: Aidlin Darling Design
Location: 355 11th Street, San Francisco, CA, USA
Architect In Charge: Joshua Aidlin, AIA – Principal, David Darling, AIA – Principal, Shane Curnyn – Project Architect
Landscape Architects: Miller Company, Jeff Miller, Kyla Burson
Area: 14,000 sqft
Year: 2008
Photographs: Matthew Millman, Richard Barnes

Structural Engineer: Berkeley Structural Design, Bill Lynch
Mechanical Engineer: CB Engineers, Chikezie Nzewie
Civil Engineer: Sandis Engineers, Bruce Davis, Mike Kuykendall
Geotechnical Engineer: Herzog Geotechnical Consulting Engineers, Craig Herzog
General Contractor: Matarozzi/Pelsinger Builders, Daniel Pelsinger & Daniel Matarozzi – Principals, Peter Kellner – Project Manager
Green Conultant: Simon & Associates, Bill Worthen
Streetscape Designer: Shift Design Studio, Jane Martin
Lighting Consultant: ALR (Associated Lighting Representatives, Inc.), Leslie Siegel, LC

From the architect. 355 Eleventh is a LEED Gold adaptive reuse of a historic and previously derelict turn-of-the-century industrial building. The three-story, 14,000-square-foot, mixed-use project was developed and constructed by the building’s primary occupant, a general contractor specializing in green building who wanted to showcase its commitment to cost-effective sustainability. This owner and general contractor occupies the entire second floor, comprised of administration and offices. The third floor is leased to design professionals. A restaurant and bar occupies the first floor and exterior courtyard.

Originally a warehouse, the historic structure’s new role as a multi-tenant workspace invoked a new set of constraints for the building envelope. Ample light and air was required for the building’s new office use, however San Francisco’s Planning Department placed strict limitations on the introduction of new fenestration due to the building’s National Register of Historic Places designation. Additionally, the structure’s original corrugated siding was required to be replaced in-kind to preserve the building’s industrial character. The architectural solution to these conflicting requirements was to perforate the building’s new corrugated skin with fields of small holes, allowing light and air to pass through new operable windows hidden behind. The perforated outer skin mitigates solar heat gain while enabling cross-ventilation of the interior. This rudimentary double-skin façade becomes a screen for sunlight and air, allowing the stoic, industrial character of the original building to be maintained without the visual introduction of new fenestration.

By carefully designing the new spaces, more than 75% of the building’s original fabric has been maintained. Significant structural upgrades were undertaken to ensure proper seismic performance of the existing timber frame – an investment on par with new construction. Clearly registering the rhythm of the historic post-and-beam structure, the original fenestration of the building’s north façade was preserved and refurbished. The existing timber and concrete frame was carefully sandblasted to reveal the warmth and texture of the original materials. As day turns to evening, the perforations in the building’s new skin gradually reveal the historic character of the timber frame within.

355 11th Street / Aidlin Darling Design © Matthew Millman 355 11th Street / Aidlin Darling Design © Richard Barnes 355 11th Street / Aidlin Darling Design © Richard Barnes 355 11th Street / Aidlin Darling Design © Richard Barnes 355 11th Street / Aidlin Darling Design © Matthew Millman 355 11th Street / Aidlin Darling Design © Matthew Millman 355 11th Street / Aidlin Darling Design © Richard Barnes 355 11th Street / Aidlin Darling Design New / Old Elevation 355 11th Street / Aidlin Darling Design Sustainable Strategies 355 11th Street / Aidlin Darling Design Steel Sheet

January 17 2014

14:00

The Green Studio / Fraher Architects

Architects: Fraher Architects
Location: London, UK
Area: 320 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Jack Hobhouse

Structural Engineer: Constant Structural Design
Joinery: Fraher and Co Ltd

From the architect. Sited opposite the Butterfly House, The Studio is a garden based creative home work space for our Architectural Practice. Situated in South East of London the building was driven by the directors need to balance a young family with an increasing workload.

The studio’s shape and orientation has resulted from a detailed sunlight analysis minimizing its impact on the surrounding buildings and ensuring high levels of day lighting to the garden and work spaces.

The split levels and grounded form helps to conceal its mass and facilitates the flowing ground- scape transition between the garden and studio. Clad in a stainless steel mesh the terraced planter beds and wild flower green roofs will combine to green the facade replacing the lost habitat.

Carefully orientated high performance glazing combined with super insulation and a robust natural ventilation strategy means the building requires no heating or cooling. Hot water for the kitchen and shower are provided by a large solar array and thermal store.

The project was completed in October 2013 and delivered to a tight budget and deadline. All the joinery was designed, fabricated and installed by the practice’s sister company Fraher + Co.

The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects © Jack Hobhouse The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects © Jack Hobhouse The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects © Jack Hobhouse The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects © Jack Hobhouse The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects © Jack Hobhouse The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects © Jack Hobhouse The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects © Jack Hobhouse The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects © Jack Hobhouse The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects © Jack Hobhouse The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects © Jack Hobhouse The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects © Jack Hobhouse The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects © Jack Hobhouse The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects © Jack Hobhouse The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects © Jack Hobhouse The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects © Jack Hobhouse The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects © Jack Hobhouse The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects © Jack Hobhouse The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects Site Plan The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects Ground Floor Plan The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects Roof Plan The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects Context Section The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects Entrance Section BB The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects Cross Section The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects Glazing and Cladding Detail The Green Studio  / Fraher Architects Fundation Details

January 16 2014

04:00

Suzlon One Earth Global Corporate Headquarters / Christopher Benninger

Architects: Christopher Benninger
Location: Pune, Maharashtra, India
Year: 2009
Photographs: A. Ramprasad Naidu

Architecture Team: Jagdeesh Taluri, Sushilkumar Khairnar, Daraius Choksi, A Madhu, Visharad Sharma, Subhankar Nag, Mansi Sahu
Project Concieved And Managed By: Jitendra Tanti, Jitesh Donga, Shimon Samuel, Synefra
Prime Contractor: R.Vasudevan, Kumar Krishnan, Narendra Badave, Vascon Engineers Ltd.
Landscape Design: Ravi & Varsha Gavandi
Interior Design: Space Matrix in association with Manish Banker, Tao Architects.
Branding And Experience: Elephant Design and Strategy
Structural Design: Santhosh ,Vastech
Construction Management: Knight Frank INDIA
Green Building Consultants: Tanmay Tathagat, Kavita Jain, Environmental Design Solution, Delhi
Cost: Rs.280 crores US$ 63 million (2009)

From the architect. Suzlon Energy Limited, a world-leading wind energy company based in Pune India, together with the architect, pledged to create the greenest office in India. Benninger calls the Tanti Family true patrons of architecture comparable to the Sarabhais, the Guggenheims and the Rockefellers. Living the motto of the company, ‘powering a greener tomorrow’, the architect relied exclusively on non-toxic and recycled materials. 

A million S.F. of ground plus two levels in a 10.4 acre urban setting achieved a leed Platinum and Teri Griha 5 Star certification with 8% of its annual energy generated on-site through photovoltaic panels and windmills with a total incremental cost of about 11%. There are no other leed certified buildings with this level of certification and on-site renewable energy that have achieved this kind of cost efficiency. With 92 % (4 MW) being consumed by the project is ‘sustainable energy’ making this a Zero Energy Project!

It has become the need of the hour for global corporations to have sensitively designed buildings which reflect their values, concerns for environment and the image of the new age. It calls for designing buildings in India with sensitivity towards climate that is both energy efficient and draws vernacular solutions. Suzlon One Earth derives its inspiration from large Indian historical campuses like Fatehpur Sikri and the Meenakshi Temple complex in Madurai. This took the shape of a Land Scraper, opposing the idea of a Skyscraper! It is a counter blast to “the glass box.”

A series of served and server spaces were created to adopt to the transformational nature of the business over the years. The Served Spaces cover the lion’s share of the campus where people work that can accommodate modular walls and furniture systems. 

These are served by more rigid cores that house wet areas, utility shafts, ducts, fire stairs, elevators, entry and reception areas that will not change over time. “Modules” like the silo fire stairs; the benchmark glass cylinders and the 8.4 by 8.4 meter modules that can be used like a Lego Set and moved about in one’s mind to create internal and external spaces. Aluminum louvers act as a protective skin allowing daylight and cross ventilation.

The design process started with a premise of creating a central gathering space, or Brahmasthan, with the sky as its ceiling! There is visual access to the large central gardens from everywhere. There is a sense of connection between the various kinds of spaces right from the underground entries vide the sunlight that descends there from the Sky Courts and the Glass Cylinders and the vegetation that flows from these elements, up through the cylinders into the main circulation nodes of the building.

The Deepa Stambh is set in the centre of the Suzlon reflecting pool.  The pool rests at the basement level, wherein all of the cafeteria and the dining room open onto the water. In the background these see a cascade of water falls, flying down three levels of tiers, with traditional step-like objects giving rhythm to the backdrop. Large water body in the central court helps in improving the air quality and for evaporative cooling. 

All the external landscape areas are brought into the indoors along the perimeter of the building bringing fresh air, nature and natural light into the work areas so as improve productivity of occupants. This central garden plaza encourages communication, interaction and innovation amongst the 2300 colleagues and provides a stunning aesthetic presentation for visitors. 

Suzlon One Earth Global Corporate Headquarters / Christopher Benninger © A. Ramprasad Naidu Suzlon One Earth Global Corporate Headquarters / Christopher Benninger © A. Ramprasad Naidu Suzlon One Earth Global Corporate Headquarters / Christopher Benninger © A. Ramprasad Naidu Suzlon One Earth Global Corporate Headquarters / Christopher Benninger © A. Ramprasad Naidu Suzlon One Earth Global Corporate Headquarters / Christopher Benninger © A. Ramprasad Naidu Suzlon One Earth Global Corporate Headquarters / Christopher Benninger © A. Ramprasad Naidu Suzlon One Earth Global Corporate Headquarters / Christopher Benninger © A. Ramprasad Naidu Suzlon One Earth Global Corporate Headquarters / Christopher Benninger © A. Ramprasad Naidu Suzlon One Earth Global Corporate Headquarters / Christopher Benninger Site Plan Suzlon One Earth Global Corporate Headquarters / Christopher Benninger Landscape Plan Suzlon One Earth Global Corporate Headquarters / Christopher Benninger Ground Floor Plan Suzlon One Earth Global Corporate Headquarters / Christopher Benninger First Floor Plan Suzlon One Earth Global Corporate Headquarters / Christopher Benninger Second Floor Plan Suzlon One Earth Global Corporate Headquarters / Christopher Benninger Thrid Floor Plan Suzlon One Earth Global Corporate Headquarters / Christopher Benninger Elevations Suzlon One Earth Global Corporate Headquarters / Christopher Benninger Sections
02:00

ip company / cp architektur

Architects: cp architektur
Location: Visbeker Damm 34, Visbek, Germany
Area: 1,196 sqm
Year: 2008
Photographs: Christian Prasser

Project Manager: Johanna Maria Priebe (Frontage / Site area), Susanne Binder (Showroom)
Interior Designer: Christian Prasser

From the architect. A cohesive overall concept for a showroom, office and outdoor area was devised for the door and window manufacturer ip company®.

One of the main requirements was that the existing building structure should remain as unchanged as possible. To meet this requirement a façade using modern materials was placed in front of the building.

The first design task was to model the façade. Oblique cut outs were inserted in it to define the window zones and to achieve a greater dynamic effect. The façade was made with Promeda boards with brown chestnut veneer décor.

The different window and door constructions were shown on four wall panels in the simple and elegant showroom. The view of the production space from the showroom established a further connection with the manufacturer.

ip company  / cp architektur © Christian Prasser ip company  / cp architektur © Christian Prasser ip company  / cp architektur © Christian Prasser ip company  / cp architektur © Christian Prasser ip company  / cp architektur © Christian Prasser ip company  / cp architektur © Christian Prasser ip company  / cp architektur © Christian Prasser ip company  / cp architektur © Christian Prasser ip company  / cp architektur © Christian Prasser ip company  / cp architektur Floor Plan ip company  / cp architektur Elevations ip company  / cp architektur Sections
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