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February 27 2014

09:00

AD Classics: Pirelli Tower / Gio Ponti, Pier Luigi Nervi

In contrast with its traditional Milanese surroundings, the Pirelli Tower is one of the earliest examples of Modernskyscrapers in Italy.  Affectionately called “Il Pirellone” (The Big Pirelli), the 127 meter tower stood as Italy’s tallest building from 1958 to 1995.  The design of the structure, led by architect/designer Gio Ponti and engineer Pier Luigi Nervi, featured a tapered plan—as opposed to the conventional rectilinear volume which was prevalent in America—encouraging greater creative freedom during a time when skyscrapers typically lacked experimentation.

Despite the fact that Italy’s economy was in turmoil following the Second World War, Pirelli, now one of the world’s largest tire manufacturers, thrived during the Fascist era.  With this in mind, Alberto Pirelli hired Gio Ponti to design an American-Style skyscraper as a symbol of corporate success and an optimistic catalyst for economic prosperity. [1]  The new skyscraper would sit at the location of a former Pirelli factory that was bombed in 1943.  Ponti assembled a team that included influential engineers Pier Luigi Nervi and Arturo Danusso, whose expertise contributed to the many architectural and engineering innovations of the project.

Ponti’s slim, 33-story structure appears to shoot up from the ground like a missile, towering over its low-rise context.  Centrally located on the project site, the tower is pushed away from the streets.  He considered this to be advantageous from an urban planning perspective: a high density building with a small footprint provided additional space for traffic and parking while bringing more ventilation, daylight, and space to the surrounding streets. [2]  The tower included two levels below grade containing parking for 800 cars, a 600-seat auditorium, a staff cafeteria, and conference spaces.  The floors above hosted open office space with movable partitions for maximum adaptability; an innovative application for the office building typology at the time.  With centrally located circulation and services, the plan and main corridor subtly taper towards the extreme ends of the tower; an efficient response to the diminishing flow of users which also gives the building a slender profile.  The narrow edges of the structure are glazed between floor slabs, while the triangular spaces on each side of the corridor accommodate mechanical ducts and emergency circulation.

Fortunately for Ponti, Nervi was an expert in reinforced concrete and possessed the technical knowledge to design a structure with such a narrow base.  The tower, which was the first in the world to use a 25 meter long span frame, featured concrete piers that become gradually thinner as they approach the top (from 80 inches to 20 inches).  This economical and efficient response to the structural load helped to maximize usable space.  Also noteworthy is the tower’s thermopane glass façade.  Anodized aluminum mullions located outside of the slabs hold the panes together to create a seamless curtain wall.  A thin roof, supported by a secondary structure, appears to hover over the building.

On the day that the Pirelli Tower was complete, Ponti, who always spoke of his work in the feminine, was so enamoured by his work that he told his daughters that “she is so beautiful that I’d love to marry her.” [3]  Consistent with his own opinion, the reception of the project was positive.  While Ponti and his team managed to bring the American skyscraper to Italy, the elegance of form suggested an Italian interpretation of the typology.  Ponti had long admired the skyscrapers of Manhattan, though it was a conversation in Brazil with Oscar Niemeyer, whom he considered to have “extraordinary formal imagination,” that provided him with the inspiration necessary to envision such an unique volume. [4]  For the public, the optimistic project, founded on ideals from the US, served as a sign of better days to come.

The tower was sold to the Lombardy Regional Administration in 1978.  It again made headlines in April 2002 when a small, out of control airplane crashed into its 24th and 25th floors, killing the pilot and two occupants.  This accident, coupled with the building’s degraded condition, prompted a 2005 renovation and complete façade replacement.

The Pirelli Tower is widely considered to be Ponti’s most significant project; it’s completion marked the pinnacle of his career.  His projects, like those of Philip Johnson, vary greatly in style as he evolved.  Between being influenced by the Novecento movement in the 1920s and 1930s, and his later Postmodern work such as the Denver Art Museum in 1971, the Pirelli Tower represents his temporary infatuation with the Modern movement. [5]  Its unconventional outcome was the result of his endeavour to create beauty through pragmatic considerations such as spatial and structural efficiency.

The innovative Pirellone was influential at local, national, and international scales.  Conveniently located adjacent to Milan Central Station (Italy’s busiest train station), the tower was the first of many modern and corporate buildings to follow in the vicinity, which evolved into Milan’s main business district.  The design provided strong influence and inspiration for several skyscrapers in following years, most notably the similarly-tapered Pan Am Building (known as the MetLife Building since 1981) in New York City.  While the Pirelli Tower served as a progressive and elegant architectural and engineering marvel, perhaps, more importantly, it also symbolized a nation’s hope, successfully preceding decades of positive economic growth in Italy.

[1]  Ziegler, Claudia. Out of Ashes and Rubble: The Pirelli Tower (Places: Forum of Design for the Public Realm, Volume 21, Issue 1, 2009).

[2]  Ponti, Gio.
Espressione dell’edificio Pirelli in Construzione a Milano, Domus, 316: 1-13.

[3]  Roccella, Graziella.
Gio Ponti, 1891-1979: Master of Lightness (Köln: Taschen, 2009).

[4]  Licitra Ponti, Lisa.
Gio Ponti: The Complete Work, 1923-1978 (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1990).

[5]  Novecento Italiano was an artistic movement that was born in Milan in 1922.  Neoclassicist in principle, it rejected contemporary styles such as Avant-Garde and Futurism, and instead sought for a revival of the values of Latin antiquity, such as harmony and purity of form.

Architects: Studio Ponti Fornaroli Roselli, Studio Valtolina Dell’Orto
Location: Via Fabio Filzi, 22, 20124 Milan, Italy
Architect In Charge: Gio Ponti
Design Team: Gio Ponti, Antonio Fornaroli, Alberto Roselli, Giuseppe Valtolina, Egidio Dell’Orto
Structural Engineers: Pier Luigi Nervi, Arturo Danusso
Area: 24000.0 sqm
Year: 1958
Photographs: Flickr user IK’s World Trip, Courtesy of Università Iuav di Venezia – SBD, Archivio Progetti, Giorgio Casali’s archive, Wikipedia Commons user LapoLuchini, Flickr user mava, Flickr user Michele M.F., Flickr user Galli Luca

AD Classics: Pirelli Tower / Gio Ponti, Pier Luigi Nervi © Flickr user IK's World Trip AD Classics: Pirelli Tower / Gio Ponti, Pier Luigi Nervi Interior. Image Courtesy of Università Iuav di Venezia - SBD, Archivio Progetti, Giorgio Casali's archive AD Classics: Pirelli Tower / Gio Ponti, Pier Luigi Nervi Courtesy of Università Iuav di Venezia - SBD, Archivio Progetti, Giorgio Casali's archive AD Classics: Pirelli Tower / Gio Ponti, Pier Luigi Nervi © Wikipedia Commons user LapoLuchini AD Classics: Pirelli Tower / Gio Ponti, Pier Luigi Nervi © Flickr user mava AD Classics: Pirelli Tower / Gio Ponti, Pier Luigi Nervi Courtesy of Università Iuav di Venezia - SBD, Archivio Progetti, Giorgio Casali's archive AD Classics: Pirelli Tower / Gio Ponti, Pier Luigi Nervi Pirelli Tower during construction. Image Courtesy of Università Iuav di Venezia - SBD, Archivio Progetti, Giorgio Casali's archive AD Classics: Pirelli Tower / Gio Ponti, Pier Luigi Nervi Pirelli Tower after plane crash. Image © Flickr user Michele M.F. AD Classics: Pirelli Tower / Gio Ponti, Pier Luigi Nervi © Flickr user Galli Luca AD Classics: Pirelli Tower / Gio Ponti, Pier Luigi Nervi Project Site Plan AD Classics: Pirelli Tower / Gio Ponti, Pier Luigi Nervi Ground Floor Plan AD Classics: Pirelli Tower / Gio Ponti, Pier Luigi Nervi 29th Floor Plan AD Classics: Pirelli Tower / Gio Ponti, Pier Luigi Nervi Plans at top, middle, and bottom (from left to right) of tower AD Classics: Pirelli Tower / Gio Ponti, Pier Luigi Nervi Cross Section

February 25 2014

10:00

Magasins Des Archives Departamentales Du Nord / zigzag architecture + J de Alzua

Architects: zigzag architecture, J de Alzua
Location: Lille, France
Area: 13000.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Julien Lanoo

Company: NORPAC
Client: CG NORD

From the architect. Conservation & Expresion

Beyond the inspiring and forward-looking idea of the concept for a positive energy building (a teamwork since the beginning of the project was completely necessary), it was necessary to suggest a building with a good distribution, a perfect functionality and an efficient conservation. The books and documents preserved in the departmental file are valuables public goods.

The architecture answer  was born from four essential points who explain the project:

- A signal in the city :  the warehouse form a seven floor homogeneous building. The main building is saw from the Metz boulevard  and  from the St Bernard Street. It’s covered with a stainless steel net. The pixellation from a papyrus morphogenesis gave the shape to the net.

-A good relationship to the place : the reorganization of the site plan allow us to link the different buildings to the main path that becomes a place for meeting, exchanging and servicing.

-An easy working : two volumes organize the program in a practical way. The workspaces and the patios take place inside the low volume. The files are placed in the high volume.

- An ultra high performance building, a positive-energy building : the main demand was to build a low-energy  consumer building. A drying system, first  in France,  and a cogeneration heating system, low energy  consumption, are setting up. 300 m2  of photovoltaic panels are placed on the roof.

Magasins Des Archives Departamentales Du Nord / zigzag architecture + J de Alzua © Julien Lanoo Magasins Des Archives Departamentales Du Nord / zigzag architecture + J de Alzua © Julien Lanoo Magasins Des Archives Departamentales Du Nord / zigzag architecture + J de Alzua © Julien Lanoo Magasins Des Archives Departamentales Du Nord / zigzag architecture + J de Alzua © Julien Lanoo Magasins Des Archives Departamentales Du Nord / zigzag architecture + J de Alzua © Julien Lanoo Magasins Des Archives Departamentales Du Nord / zigzag architecture + J de Alzua © Julien Lanoo Magasins Des Archives Departamentales Du Nord / zigzag architecture + J de Alzua © Julien Lanoo Magasins Des Archives Departamentales Du Nord / zigzag architecture + J de Alzua © Julien Lanoo Magasins Des Archives Departamentales Du Nord / zigzag architecture + J de Alzua © Julien Lanoo Magasins Des Archives Departamentales Du Nord / zigzag architecture + J de Alzua © Julien Lanoo Magasins Des Archives Departamentales Du Nord / zigzag architecture + J de Alzua © Julien Lanoo Magasins Des Archives Departamentales Du Nord / zigzag architecture + J de Alzua © Julien Lanoo Magasins Des Archives Departamentales Du Nord / zigzag architecture + J de Alzua © Julien Lanoo Magasins Des Archives Departamentales Du Nord / zigzag architecture + J de Alzua © Julien Lanoo Magasins Des Archives Departamentales Du Nord / zigzag architecture + J de Alzua © Julien Lanoo Magasins Des Archives Departamentales Du Nord / zigzag architecture + J de Alzua Floor Plan Magasins Des Archives Departamentales Du Nord / zigzag architecture + J de Alzua Section Magasins Des Archives Departamentales Du Nord / zigzag architecture + J de Alzua North Elevation Magasins Des Archives Departamentales Du Nord / zigzag architecture + J de Alzua Axonometric Scheme

February 24 2014

14:00

Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli

Architects: Simone Micheli
Location: Venice, Italy
Area: 760.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Juergen Eheim

From the architect. Merged in the green depths of the Riviera del Brenta, dotted by spectacular Venetian patrician  villas this masterpiece was designed by Giannantonio Selva in the second decade of the nineteenth century.

The comparison with the story has its roots in an area rich in attendance and visitors, the genius loci, which is mentioned by Dante in the Divine Comedy, which inspired Lord Byron when staying in the nearby Mira or Gabriele D’Annunzio who cites the lagoon in “The Fire” was perceived and appreciated over time by great minds: not by  chance Galileo Galilei, Carlo Goldoni and Casanova loved to stay in these places. Of this “story” was surely instructed Selva who in his travels between Rome, London and Paris had cultivated a taste evolved into a neo-palladian neo-classical rhythmic balance of shapes and decorations. 

The Doric order synthesized and reworked punctuates the mighty façade divided by seven round arches symmetrical to the central palladian portal finished in smooth venetian plaster  and medallions decorated by frescos and ippocrani and surmounted by a large pediment.

The Barchessa infact as a stable of the villa housed breed race horses that are also painted in the boxes of equestrian paintings on the facade. For structures covering the entire building Selva had repeated the same structural system of wooden trusses of one of his great project: the Teatro La Fenice in Venice. Imagine the scene in the late eighteenth century in a misty morning at dawn, “mice” and “peate” on channel discharging stone blocks and statues, the architect Giannantonio Selva with its rolls of drawings and cartouches controls the vanishing and the patron of Villa Gritti Marchini who wanders around at the edge of his gondola ready to leave again for Venice. 

222 years later in a spring twilight the architect Simone Micheli, parked his white SUV in the park with his Ipad hovers around the same prospects of the semi-dark Barchessa to decide the new lighting scenes while the workers involved in the restoration cross the mighty gates in wrought iron under the gaze of the four allegorical statues witnesses of the renewed splendor after a day in the yard.

Directed lighting turns on the headlights of an exciting interior design by architect Simone Micheli for new offices and showroom of RUBENSLUCIANO compared with the old memories that have been restored and enhanced through the new forms and materials of last generation. Candor and transparency – in high definition- allow you to read the ancient presences: the vertical connections, the crystal parapets and the lift fully glazed are the elements of a new digital architecture, liquid and light in contrast to the materiality of the details of the stone and vaulted ceilings and lacunar always visible and admired.  So it was possible to give the light to the stone-paved flooring with geometric diamond pattern drown in a snowy venetian pastellone where are laid the thin white stilts supporting aerodynamic balustraded mezzanine floors – on all sides – from a tape crystal is modeled profiles curvilinear. Vertical angle curved side scenes filter flows and the various functions located at an even pace between the modules of counter tops and white lacquered cabinets. The ground floor houses the creative division offices in open space sequences dominated by apollonion rigor of pure shapes with white melamine hitech worktops on a structure in painted aluminum and ergonomic chairs on wheels. In the central part, the large reception, background of synthesized lines, some septa white angled curved, with sliding doors, identify the area offices and graphics printers as diametrically opposed to the first office develops the showroom “materials, shoes and search “emphasized by the three major exhibitors overlapping ring countered where they are exposed all models shoe and some places on island with worktop in white melamine laminate structure on a hitech white painted aluminum for the exhibition of products.

At two opposite ends through the two vaulted exedras embellished by precious frescoes perspective of a coffered ceiling is reached the administration office, the room of representatives and the floorʼs services with large white porcelain sink resting on a L shaped shelf in glossy black that balances the system of automated hand dryer popped inside a powerful stainless steel chrome tube.

The staircase and the elevator in white painted steel and glass give access to lightweight mezzanine floors on stilts on the first floor where in four main areas are all open space offices identified as many of the creative division, with the same logic and distribution of furniture of the floor below, a slight suspension wrapped in a cloud of light that filters through the large arched windows on the fronts of the crescents and is reflected in the bleached oak parquet running longitudinally increases the sense of infinite perspective lightens further spatial perception. Some plasterboard false ceilings modeled in their geometric run the same flowing lines designed by the mezzanines and slight lowering in their lofts allow adjustable recessed spotlights to illuminate in a timely manner all work areas and general distribution pathways on the ground floor. Bounded by walls and sliding doors lies the creative area and services floor with dressing room with large white porcelain basin resting on shelf L shaped gloss black lacquered that balances the system of automatic hand dryer popped into a mighty stainless steel tube, chrome that descends from the ceiling. 

On the second floor the large foyer lined with oak parquet welcomes visitors on a fascinating place under the large wooden structures with trusses that are enhanced in their mighty materiality of a careful game of adjustable led light. The old original trusses have been the subject of a careful restoration and renovation and the result of this great work of consolidation brings the viewer into the world of large structural complexes such as the cathedrals or theaters which the Giannantonio Selva had in mind when he designed the barn.

In open space square blocks covered in bleached oak with generous spaces undermount removable glossy lacquered generate a little kitchen available to staff and external customers with the two large tables with white painted metal structure surrounded by fluid fourteen sessions with sled and shell in white plastic. The constant movement of compressive and tensile strength of the roof structure are synchronized on the ground with large industrial shelving with sliding handle disc beveled white for the “cosmic” of the leather samples and materials. 

In sterometric volume batch scanning and primary forms stand eps glossy white resin walls: a sinuous tentacle that wraps around and reveals curves and chicanes after the showroom with built- in niches carved into the matter with rounded edges on all sides that stretch as thin lips to be reverberated from the joints of the recessed adjustable led mini spotlights. In an eccentric position with regard to access to this area is the large meeting table with circular string beam tapered structure in the center and accompanied by seven swivel armchairs. The wood is the protagonist chosen to characterize and distinguish the meeting room with the majestic table made from the trunk of a cedar of Lebanon of which the bark – barely touched – is still visible and that you can feel all its aroma of resin-coated resting on mirror plinths and equipped with fifteen seats that are reflected in the mirror where is framed a 60″plasma tv. More intimate and relaxed mood in the office of Rubens Luciano: wall art gallery of nude framed in black are imaginary windows on the bodies waiting to be dressed in future projects of this mind, the desk stands on the floor with white thermoformed top and wood veneer fronts, the two black chairs, with their unique color throughout the project, while in front of the large two-seats sofa two smoke tables are declined in a shop window display box with glass top and a wooden tray to support the two moments of a long and fascinating creative process that have crystallized in the memory of the finished work and the vibrant energy of the prototype. 

Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli © Juergen Eheim Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli © Juergen Eheim Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli © Juergen Eheim Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli © Juergen Eheim Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli © Juergen Eheim Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli © Juergen Eheim Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli © Juergen Eheim Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli © Juergen Eheim Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli © Juergen Eheim Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli © Juergen Eheim Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli © Juergen Eheim Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli © Juergen Eheim Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli © Juergen Eheim Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli © Juergen Eheim Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli © Juergen Eheim Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli © Juergen Eheim Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli © Juergen Eheim Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli © Juergen Eheim Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli © Juergen Eheim Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli © Juergen Eheim Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli © Juergen Eheim Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli First Floor Plan Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli Second Floor Plan Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli Ground Floor Plan Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli Sketch Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli Sketch Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli Sketch Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli Sketch Rubens Luciano / Simone Micheli Sketch

February 21 2014

19:00

VIDEO: The Endless Table

Click here to view the embedded video.

When designing offices for creative companies, it’s important to strike a balance between an efficient workplace, a fun space to be in, and an attention-grabbing signature for the company itself. That’s exactly what Clive Wilkinson Architects did for the Barbarian Group, an advertising group in New York for whom they designed the Endless Table, a single desk which both seats all of their 125 staff members, but also defines spaces within the office, such as meeting rooms and cozy work nooks.

You can watch the video above where the Chairman and the CEO of the Barbarian Group give you a tour of their new home; the New York Times has also conducted an interview with Clive Wilkinson where you can see some great images and find out more about the inspiration behind the project.

February 20 2014

12:00

SFR Headquarters / Jean-Paul Viguier Architecture

Architects: Jean-Paul Viguier Architecture
Location: 93210 Saint-Denis, France
Area: 135000.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Éric Sempé

Developper: Vinci Immobilier Promotion
Technical Studies : SETEC Bâtiment
Technical Studies (Facades) : EPP France
Lighting : Seul Soleil

From the architect. The new 130,000 sq m SFR headquarters in the Landy-Pleyel ZAC (mixed development zone) boasts nearly 8,500 employee workstations.

The building, designed by Jean-Paul Viguier, “adopts the metaphor of the tree, which experiences continual growth and rebirth, adapting constantly to external conditions. The project takes the form of a campus, atop a trunk with protruding branches leading to terraces and large multi-level gardens.”

The principle is based on the idea of unity and union, with four main buildings presented both as a unified whole and as discrete spaces, in other words several buildings which must form a visual whole and reflect the corporate culture in detail: strong roots (the trunk) and various business units characterised by their diversity (the branches). Each element is linked horizontally for journeys promoting contact and communication.

The emphasis is placed on building the relationship with the environment: the employees’ workspace environment and the site’s specific environment for genuine contextuality in an industrial landscape; and, with a light, breathing building, the relationship with the gardens that surround the building.

Daylight is a key project component fostering pleasant working conditions and optimal energy efficiency, achieved partly by using alternate glass and metal components, with varying openings, reflection levels and densities to suit the space. The facades act like an item of clothing which changes in nature to suit the degree of exposure. Providing protection on the northern side against sound pressure from the main roads, cold and shade, the garment changes to the west and east with external blinds, glass containing aluminium for extra flexibility, and openings. To the south, facing the gardens, large horizontal overlaps protect against the sun and the partition walls directly adjoin the outer walls. Which is where the stairwells are located, facing the gardens, for permanent visual contact with the redesigned landscape. Shared services are grouped together on the ground floor for a smooth and active relationship with resource-rich common areas: several restaurants, fitness suite, squash courts, relaxation space, etc.

SFR Headquarters  / Jean-Paul Viguier Architecture © Éric Sempé SFR Headquarters  / Jean-Paul Viguier Architecture © Éric Sempé SFR Headquarters  / Jean-Paul Viguier Architecture © Éric Sempé SFR Headquarters  / Jean-Paul Viguier Architecture © Éric Sempé SFR Headquarters  / Jean-Paul Viguier Architecture © Éric Sempé SFR Headquarters  / Jean-Paul Viguier Architecture © Éric Sempé SFR Headquarters  / Jean-Paul Viguier Architecture © Éric Sempé SFR Headquarters  / Jean-Paul Viguier Architecture © Éric Sempé SFR Headquarters  / Jean-Paul Viguier Architecture © Éric Sempé SFR Headquarters  / Jean-Paul Viguier Architecture © Éric Sempé SFR Headquarters  / Jean-Paul Viguier Architecture © Éric Sempé SFR Headquarters  / Jean-Paul Viguier Architecture © Éric Sempé SFR Headquarters  / Jean-Paul Viguier Architecture Aerial View SFR Headquarters  / Jean-Paul Viguier Architecture Site Plan SFR Headquarters  / Jean-Paul Viguier Architecture Fourth Level Plan
04:00

Interior Work for Solid Technology Headquarter / WeeAssociates

Architects: WeeAssociates
Location: Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea
Design Team: Yu Jung Wee, Suk Joon Roh
Area: 7400.0 sqm
Photographs: Courtesy of WeeAssociates

From the architect. In the basement floor, Rotunda shaped multipurpose hall provides spaces for programs such as  seminars, musical performance, parties and casual gatherings.

The multipurpose hall spaces could be transformed from one program to other programs by its open and closed operation with using moving sliding rounded walls.

The buffet restaurant space and fitness center are also located at the basement level. To achieve organic relationship of spaces, several long curved walls are used to divide the space and programs like rotunda, restaurant and fitness club.

Through main lobby and mezzanine floor, Cheppo marble with rough and exposed cement like raw-quality  is mainly used and steel, glass and wood is used for details like column, stair cases, media wall, handrails and canopy.

This heterogeneous mixture of materials offers dramatic spatial atmosphere. The wooden floating  gigantic canopy elements is located on the center of ceiling with two steel surrounded columns. This elements become hierarchical elements to organize the spaces and materials n main lobby.

To create gallery like environment, the media wall is installed vertically at the staircases from 3rd floor to 10 th floor within a various size of modular panel system with reflective stainless steel plate and media art playing LED monitors.

The second lobby located at the back of the building and it offers dynamic and comfort atmosphere by using diagonal pocket-shaped lobby entrance-space by using wooden materials.

Also by using different materials, like wood and marble, processionally through hallways from second lobby to main lobby, it avoid typical monotonous experience.

For an interactive office environment ,main lounge areas, rest areas, reading rooms and

 series of small open and closed meeting rooms are placed to have organic relationship through programs and activities. By using series of walls with different materials and functions, people could work and interact easily.

This layout allows for people to have different types and size of meetings and also make transformation possible from casual gathering to formal gathering by its necessity. By passing through the multiple size of meeting rooms ,interactive working spaces and executive rooms are placed.

To avoid generic symmetry of typical elevator hall, different two types of materials, cheppo-marble and black reflective stainless steel, has been applied.

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February 17 2014

23:15

Harry Gugger Studio’s ‘The Exchange’ to Rise in Vancouver

Construction broke ground last month for ‘The Exchange’ tower in Vancouver, Canada’s first LEED Platinum heritage conversion and Harry Gugger Studio’s first North American building. The 31-floor office building resolves the strict urban regulations imposed on high-rise construction downtown and addresses the historical context by preserving and integrating the façade of the city’s historic Stock Exchange building.

Rainer Sherwey of Credit Suisse, one of the joint-owners of the project, commented that “the urban space restrictions and the legal height limits for the ‘view corridors’ were enormous challenges that had to be considered when finding a solution.”

Despite these restrictions, which prohibit the Exchange from soaring above the city skyline, the building unassumingly fills the allowable built volume. The mass of the tower is broken up by successive voluminous projections and the persistent verticality and cadence of its mullions.

Another challenge for the architect was juxtaposing a contemporary steel and glass tower with the historical brick and concrete stock exchange in a way that would harmoniously resolve these discordant styles.

Harry Gugger comments about his resolution, saying that the Exchange “does not attempt to dominate or compete with this prominent original building but rather to successfully work together with it in order to create an overall composition that looks at once to Vancouver’s future without obscuring its past.”

“Given Mr. Gugger’s experience with heritage restorations and conversions such as the eloquent execution of the Tate Modern in London,” adds Frank Gehriger, CEO of SwissReal, the project’s second client, “we knew we found the perfect design partner. The Exchange will be an iconic tower that will forever enhance Vancouver’s skyline.”

The project is currently under construction and slated for completion in August 2016.

Architects: Harry Gugger Studio Ltd.
Location: 475 Howe Street, Vancouver, BC V6C 2B3, Canada
Harry Gugger Studio Team: José Pedro Azevedo, Severin Berchtold, Wtanya Chanvitan, Alasdair Graham, Harry Gugger, Katja Kleinhert, Korbinian Schneider
Architect Of Record: Iredale Group Architecture, Vancouver BC
Client: Credit Suisse Real Estate Fund International, Swissreal
Area: 37370.0 sqm
Year: 2016
Photographs: Courtesy of Harry Gugger Studio

Harry Gugger Studio's 'The Exchange' to Rise in Vancouver Courtesy of Harry Gugger Studio Harry Gugger Studio's 'The Exchange' to Rise in Vancouver Courtesy of Harry Gugger Studio Harry Gugger Studio's 'The Exchange' to Rise in Vancouver Courtesy of Harry Gugger Studio Harry Gugger Studio's 'The Exchange' to Rise in Vancouver Courtesy of Harry Gugger Studio Harry Gugger Studio's 'The Exchange' to Rise in Vancouver Courtesy of Harry Gugger Studio Harry Gugger Studio's 'The Exchange' to Rise in Vancouver Courtesy of Harry Gugger Studio Harry Gugger Studio's 'The Exchange' to Rise in Vancouver Courtesy of Harry Gugger Studio Harry Gugger Studio's 'The Exchange' to Rise in Vancouver Courtesy of Harry Gugger Studio Harry Gugger Studio's 'The Exchange' to Rise in Vancouver Old Stock Exchange. Image Courtesy of Harry Gugger Studio Harry Gugger Studio's 'The Exchange' to Rise in Vancouver Detail View. Image Courtesy of Harry Gugger Studio Harry Gugger Studio's 'The Exchange' to Rise in Vancouver Detail View. Image Courtesy of Harry Gugger Studio Harry Gugger Studio's 'The Exchange' to Rise in Vancouver Setback Plan Diagram. Image Courtesy of Harry Gugger Studio Harry Gugger Studio's 'The Exchange' to Rise in Vancouver Plan Matrix. Image Courtesy of Harry Gugger Studio Harry Gugger Studio's 'The Exchange' to Rise in Vancouver Plan L23-29. Image Courtesy of Harry Gugger Studio Harry Gugger Studio's 'The Exchange' to Rise in Vancouver Section. Image Courtesy of Harry Gugger Studio Harry Gugger Studio's 'The Exchange' to Rise in Vancouver Plan L30. Image Courtesy of Harry Gugger Studio Harry Gugger Studio's 'The Exchange' to Rise in Vancouver Abstract Elevations. Image Courtesy of Harry Gugger Studio Harry Gugger Studio's 'The Exchange' to Rise in Vancouver Abstract Elevation (South). Image Courtesy of Harry Gugger Studio
11:00

AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert

The Woolworth Building, an innovative and elegant early skyscraper completed in 1913, endures today as an iconic form on the New York City skyline. A historicist exterior sheaths a modern steel tower, embodying both the era’s modern spirit of progress and its hesitation to fully break from the past. Cass Gilbert, selected as the architect, believed the designer should “weave into the pattern of our own civilization the beauty that is our inheritance.”[1]  An ornate monument to the growing economic dominance of New York City, the building was dubbed the “Cathedral of Commerce.”

Commissioned by retail magnate Frank W. Woolworth, who controlled almost six hundred “five and dime” stores, the project sited at 233 Broadway was to become a new corporate headquarters, a generator of rental income, and an elegant billboard to bolster his company’s reputation. Woolworth financed the building independently without loans or assistance from developers, an atypical condition for a building of that size.

Architect Cass Gilbert had established a national reputation for designing regal civil buildings, predominantly in the Beaux Arts style.  Born in Minnesota, Gilbert returned to St. Paul to start his own practice after a number of years studying at MIT, traveling through Europe and working for McKim, Meade and White. He relocated his firm to New York City in 1900. Gilbert believed that public buildings should serve the public, and whatever expense required to make them beautiful should be allocated.

While initially envisioned as the tallest structure in its neighborhood at 45 stories at 625 feet tall, the final design grew to 60 stories at 792 feet tall, making it the tallest building in the world at the time of its completion. Located on Broadway in lower Manhattan bordering City Hall Park, the Woolworth building occupies the entire block between Park Place and Barclay Street.

Gilbert worked with structural engineer Gunvald Aus on the innovative foundation and steel frame.  Sixty-nine pneumatic caissons ranging from 6.5 and 18.75 inches in diameter were driven down to bedrock 100 to 120 feet below grade to support the towering mass. Closely spaced steel beams, called a grillage, were installed atop each caisson to transfer building loads. Because construction on the caissons began before Woolworth acquired additional property and enlarged the design, additional caissons and enormous transfer girders spanning between the original 38 concrete piers were required.

Wind loads drove the steel frame design. Steel arches (portal braces) rigidly connect many columns on middle floors. The base of the tower is reinforced by concentric chevron bracing and the upper corners by “K” shaped knee braces.

The lobby and basement levels fill the entire site footprint, with setbacks along the building’s height permitting light to reach street.  The twenty-four stories stacked above the lobby occupy a “U” shaped floor plan with a central elevator core.  This shift in the massing allows for a skylight atop the lobby level grand stair hall and lets ample daylight reach office spaces.  Hipped roofs top the longer bars of this volume and only a slender tower rises above.  Adding almost thirty additional stories to the building, this svelte volume steps back and is finally capped by a pyramidal roof.

The final building was an engineering and construction feat of its time: 792 feet tall, 60 floors, 206 million pounds, 15 acres of floor area, 3000 exterior windows, 24,000 tons of steel, 17 million bricks and 7,500 tons of terra cotta. [2] A number of innovations are hidden within the ornate Neo-gothic envelope: a higher ratio of office to elevator space than any earlier skyscraper, a new elevator safety system with air cushions at the bottom of each shaft, and components erected at an unprecedented rapid pace.

With the design for both the interior and exterior, Gilbert brought the grandeur and authority of a civic building to a corporate tower.  Ornate exterior cladding of cream terra cotta with blue and yellow glazed accents evokes guildhall architecture of France and England. Slim vertical piers accentuate the verticality of the building. A green patina-ed copper roof replete with gargoyles and tracery tops the building.

The symmetrical cruciform lobby welcomes visitors with spectacular decor. It is adorned with Early Christian inspired barrel vault mosaics, a stained glass skylight, marble walls, bronze furnishings, and plaster grotesques, including ones of Woolworth counting coins and Gilbert holding a model of the building.

The Woolworth Building was largely met with admiration and awe, because as a pamphlet on the building asserted “brute material has been robbed of its density and flung into the sky to challenge its loveliness.” [3] Contemporaries saw it as more than a means to produce profit or an expression of corporate power; its form became a precedent for the 1916 zoning law regulating building envelopes and prototype for a group of skyscrapers built in the 1930s. The critical reception was positive: The New York World called it the “American architectural masterpiece of the twentieth century” and the New York Times compared it to the world’s greatest architectural wonders. [4]

Renovations in the 1970s by Ehrenkrantz & Associates replaced much of the ornate exterior cladding with cast stone panels and simplified some of the ornate detailing. The building has outlived the Woolworth Company, which went out of business in 1997. In 2012 a development group purchased the top 30 floors with the intention to turn them into luxury condos, as well as make minor upgrades to the building.  Proposed renovations include window replacements and new window openings, adding a canopy at the residential entrance, and restoring a long abandoned swimming pool in the basement.

For more information on the Woolworth building, check out the online exhibition and lecture videos from The Skyscraper Museum or read a detailed description in a 1983 Landmark Preservation Commission document.  An in depth discussion of the building and culture of the time can be found in the print book: The Skyscraper and the City: The Woolworth Building and the Making of Modern New York.

Sources:

1 “Response on the occasion of the presentation of The Gold Medal for Architecture of the Society of Arts and Sciences to Cass Gilbert, New York, January 16, 1931” in Cass Gilbert: Reminiscences and Addresses

2 Sewell Chan, “A New History for an Old Skyscraper,” New York Times, July 25, 2008, accessed January 21, 2014.

3 S. Parkes Cadman, Forward to The Cathedral of Commerce by Edwin A. Cochran, (New York: Broadway Park Place CO, 1916)

4 Michael Tavel Clarke, These Days of Large Things: The Culture of Size in America, 1865-1930. (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2007), 166

Architects: Cass Gilbert
Location: 233 Broadway
Architect In Charge: Cass Gilbert
Structure Engineer: Gunvald Aus
Client: F. W. Woolworth
Area: 0.0 ft2
Year: 1913
Photographs: Aaron Sylvan, Courtesy of Flickr Commons Project, Penn State Libraries Pictures Collection, Flickr user Bob Jagendorf, Flickr user Epicharmus, Flickr user Timmy Caldwell, Flickr user Alan Miles NYC, Bob Estremera, Drawings published in American Architect, 103

AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert View of Woolworth Building and surrounding buildings (ca. 1913), via Wikimedia Commons AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert Blue and yellow accents. Image © Aaron Sylvan AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert Stairs in the rear of the lobby. Image © Aaron Sylvan AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert Woolworth Building under construction, circa 1912. Image Courtesy of Flickr Commons Project AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert Typical upper level plan. Image © Penn State Libraries Pictures Collection AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert © Flickr user Bob Jagendorf AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert Vertical emphasis and ornate spandrel panels. Image © Aaron Sylvan AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert © Flickr user Epicharmus AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert © Aaron Sylvan AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert Exterior detail. Image © Aaron Sylvan AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert Exterior detail. Image © Aaron Sylvan AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert Exterior detail. Image © Flickr user Timmy Caldwell AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert Night view  of tower. Image © Aaron Sylvan AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert © Flickr user Alan Miles NYC AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert Exterior view during One World Trade Center construction. Image © Bob Estremera AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert Night view through trees. Image © Aaron Sylvan AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert Building signage. Image © Bob Estremera AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert © Aaron Sylvan AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert Lobby mosaic . Image © Aaron Sylvan AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert View of lobby skylight. Image © Bob Estremera AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert © Bob Estremera AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert View in lobby. Image © Bob Estremera AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert View into lobby. Image © Bob Estremera AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert View of lobby ceiling. Image © Bob Estremera AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert Elevator corridor detail. Image © Bob Estremera AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert Door to the safe deposit vault. Image © Bob Estremera AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert © Bob Estremera AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert © Bob Estremera AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert Sculptural lobby element. Image © Bob Estremera AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert Sculptural lobby element. Image © Bob Estremera AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert Second basement level. Image © Penn State Libraries Pictures Collection AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert First basement level. Image © Penn State Libraries Pictures Collection AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert Lobby level. Image © Penn State Libraries Pictures Collection AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert Wind bracing diagram. Image © Drawings published in American Architect, 103 AD Classics: Woolworth Building / Cass Gilbert Grillage plan. Image © Drawings published in American Architect, 103

February 11 2014

02:00

Adjustable Forms / DLR Group

Architects: DLR Group
Location: 1 East Progress Road, Lombard, IL 60148, USA
Architect In Charge: Nathan Casteel
Area: 20145.0 ft2
Year: 2013
Photographs: James Steinkamp

Interior Designer: Whitney Architects, Jessie James
General Contractor: James and Eric Lindquist
Landscape Architect: Ecology Vision, LLC Andy Stahr
Mep, Structural, Civil Engineer: W-T Engineering

From the architect. Adjustable Forms Inc., established as one of the most respected and advanced cast-in-place concrete construction firms in the country, had outgrown their current facility located in Lombard, IL.  They sought out to renovate and expand upon their current office and warehouse functions and had a desire to provide an aesthetic that was a reflection upon their work.  The design team conceived the project as a vehicle to showcase the client’s talents and capabilities while expanding their own knowledge of concrete and its potential.

The project is comprised of an expansion and renovation of the existing office and warehouse facility.  The 8,000sqft office features an office suite, an employee lounge, a collaboration area, a specialized BIM room, a reception area and a trellised courtyard while the 12,145sqft warehouse provides ample space for equipment storage, a manager’s office and a mechanical shop.  

The design focused on reusing the existing building’s elements where possible. Reused elements consist of structural piles, foundations, steel joists, columns, roof deck, and brick masonry walls.  The existing concrete slabs were crushed and repurposed as granular fill material for new floor systems.  The project is registered with the USGBC and is tracking LEED Gold certification. 

The building design is a reflection of concrete as a material and a process.  Several methods of concrete construction are used to showcase the owner’s technical ability; including post-tensioning roof and floor slabs, full height thermally broken and insulated sandwich walls, form liner and board formed textured walls, integrally colored stamped and polished concrete flooring, and traditional reinforced concrete.  Color, texture, and concrete mix were explored and experimented with throughout the design process. 

The concrete mix for the exterior concrete contains a 40% slag mix.  Several different form liner textures and true wood planks are used to achieve various levels of finish.  The wood textures draw on the history of traditional methods of casting concrete.  Reinforcing elements are revealed in the form of a post-tension cable system that serves as a visible trellis system and a security wall application separating public and private. 

The design limited the materials used to provide a pure minimalist aesthetic.  A high performance rain screen system and solid panel system made of black zinc were used to bring a sophisticated contrast to the stark minimalist light colored concrete massing.  On the interior, day-lighting is optimized with skylights and