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October 31 2010

00:00

Queensland Courtyard House / Plazibat & Jemmott Architects

© Plazibat & Jemmott Architects

Australian firm, Plazibat & Jemmott Architects, shared their most recent competition submission with us.   The competition asked participants to design a residence using Australian building material supplier Boral’s selection of products.  “This model takes a holistic approach to the issue of sustainable suburbs and is interested not so much in the technicalities of water harvesting or co-generation, but rather through increased efficiency, density and social interaction,” explained the architects.

More about the residence after the break.

The residence’s proposed site is part of an existing urban fringe suburb of Brisbane and of a larger group of buildings that form an alternative proposition to inner city density.

© Plazibat & Jemmott Architects

The proposal began with the initial idea of a public/private courtyard/ garden space around which the sub-tropical house program was developed.   The house is organized around the courtyard space and takes advantage of the natural slope of the site.   As the architects attempted to blur the lines between internal and external, the courtyard provides an opportunity for an internal landscape to be developed not just on horizontal surfaces but also vertical, giving the building’s its formal expression.

© Plazibat & Jemmott Architects

Accessed from several ways, the courtyard is framed by the glazed inclined stair bridges and the vertical gardens. The undercroft of the elevated bedrooms is utilized as a protected space which inherently becomes an ‘outdoor room’ and an extension of the internal plan.

© Plazibat & Jemmott Architects

Regarding materials, the architects wished to build upon the idea of private and public, so the robust brick and concrete external treatment sits in stark contrast to the finely crafted intimate interior. In addition to focusing on natural modern or recycled materials, the architects also took into consideration the  long term maintenance, proportion, simplicity and timelessness of the materials. Materials such as clay, timber and recycled concrete (colored) were deemed appropriate for these requirements.

© Plazibat & Jemmott Architects

Image1 © Plazibat & Jemmott Architects Image2 © Plazibat & Jemmott Architects Image © Plazibat & Jemmott Architects Image4 © Plazibat & Jemmott Architects Image5 © Plazibat & Jemmott Architects Image6 © Plazibat & Jemmott Architects Image7 © Plazibat & Jemmott Architects Image8 © Plazibat & Jemmott Architects Image9 © Plazibat & Jemmott Architects Image10 © Plazibat & Jemmott Architects

Project Information:

Design team: Tony Jemmott, Shane Plazibat, Tim Stephens

October 30 2010

03:00

Plaza Residence / Migdal Arquitectos

© Migdal Arquitectos

Architects: Migdal Arquitectos / Jaime Varon, Abraham Metta, Alex Metta
Location: Mexico City, Mexico
Project Year: 2008
Photographs: Courtesy of Migdal Arquitectos

© Migdal Arquitectos

Due to the redesign and recovery of the Historic Center of Mexico City, Paseo de la Reforma, one of the most important avenues of the city, reemerges as the most beautiful commercial, cultural and historic avenue of the metropolis. In recent years, distinct real estate property developments of exceptional importance and magnitude have been developed on this avenue. One of these new developments is the Plaza Residences building; an emblematic building.

© Migdal Arquitectos

The building is flanked by two cultural landmarks that enroot it with the historic past of the area, the Monument to Columbus and the Monument to the Revolution. The shape of the building gives richness and movement to the urban context. Plaza Residences becomes a sculpturesque object that acts as a showcase that defines the Monument to Columbus on one of the most sightly corners of Avenida Reforma.

plan 02

In response to the Columbus traffic circle, the building, with its glass interior façade, is erected in the shape of a boomerang, creating a concave interior space that we give to the city by way of Reforma. This concave shape opens up and embraces the majestic traffic circle, integrating it into its concept. The boomerang shape draws out from a long linear element which constringes into the plot with the intention of presenting a considerable unfoldment of façade towards Reforma, making it possible to favor all the apartments with views towards the majestic avenue.

section

The existing urban belt continues thanks to the basement of the building, which is presented as a continuous element with a collection of perforations. This stone pedestal gives presence to the first floors that accommodate common areas, commercial areas and services.

© Migdal Arquitectos

The building is an abstract entity giving a sense of scalelessness; its principal façade present itself as a smooth-skinned glass curtain, permitting, at a glance, the loss of perception of the building’s floors. The building’s skin is accentuated with randomly placed aluminum mullions, which control the effect of the sun, while creating an interesting effect of light and shadow in the concave shape.

© Migdal Arquitectos

The apartment tower is divided into two zones, both with independent access and lobbies. Each apartment is designed based on the position occupied thereby in the tower according to its orientation. The building has apartments and suites of between 60 and 170 square meters, 4 basement parking lots, common areas for the apartments and a commercial ground floor.

Art is integrated into the Plaza Residences project by means of a raised mural plaza or “pisal”, which, apart from being a common plaza, also serves as a transition towards the exterior, further favoring visual contact towards the great avenue. The apartments, of single or double height.

plan 03

Due to its circular shape and horizontal bands of its convex façade, the building becomes an abstract crown in contrast to the Cantera stone of the monument to the Revolution. The passage ways to access the suites that run the entire length of the building become viewpoints providing a unique view of Mexico City.

The corners of the building emphasize its height with an abstract language by means of vertical elements which break the horizontality of the aluminum mullions. One of the vertical elements shifts position to move and converts itself with a group of columns and glass in a “box of light”, giving presence to the building.

© Migdal Arquitectos

The building accommodates a business center, fitness center, projection room, swimming pool with a bird’s-eye view of Reforma; a kid’s club, lounge, events hall, parking lot, common open-air plaza and technology.

The constructive system of Plaza Residences is complex and specialized. We used a high volume of concrete and steel in a remarkable system, from the soil mechanics system to the constructive system. The volume of concrete used was 51,707.50 m2

© Migdal Arquitectos

We used a complex and specialized engineering as the pressure retaining system and as a resistant system against Mexico City earthquakes. We used metal box piles at 54 meters, such as an hybrid system of box pile and “milan walls” to give support to the basement.

Above the basement is a 20-floor apartment tower. The structure is of reinforced (structural steel) concrete columns. The reinforced concrete was subsequently poured in order to form the main structure.

© Migdal Arquitectos

Plaza Residences is a Susteinable Building which has a façade with alluminum mullions which control the effect of the sun. Also has water tank, a reserve for firefighting, hydrants, pressurized fire escapes and controlled accesses with quick-release fire doors. Common Pump Room for drinking water tank and rainwater tank. Ten water tanks in the Roof area. Anaerobic Treatment Plant. A 1,281-Kw electrical substation, emergency plant, energy saving systems with sensor and timer-controlled electric lights in the parking lot basements, the passageways of the apartment tower and common areas. Five gas tanks, a carbon monoxide detection system in the parking lots, an air ventilation and air injection system in the parking lot basements, ventilation in the common area kitchen, ventilation in the swimming pool area, and ventilation in the kitchens, restrooms and utility rooms of the apartments. Evaporative air coolers are installed for servicing the common areas. Six elevators, and freight elevators in Basements E-1 and E-2.

Plaza Residence / Migdal Arquitectos © Migdal Arquitectos Plaza Residence / Migdal Arquitectos © Migdal Arquitectos Plaza Residence / Migdal Arquitectos © Migdal Arquitectos Plaza Residence / Migdal Arquitectos © Migdal Arquitectos Plaza Residence / Migdal Arquitectos © Migdal Arquitectos Plaza Residence / Migdal Arquitectos © Migdal Arquitectos Plaza Residence / Migdal Arquitectos © Migdal Arquitectos Plaza Residence / Migdal Arquitectos © Migdal Arquitectos Plaza Residence / Migdal Arquitectos © Migdal Arquitectos Plaza Residence / Migdal Arquitectos © Migdal Arquitectos Plaza Residence / Migdal Arquitectos © Migdal Arquitectos Plaza Residence / Migdal Arquitectos © Migdal Arquitectos Plaza Residence / Migdal Arquitectos © Migdal Arquitectos Plaza Residence / Migdal Arquitectos © Migdal Arquitectos Plaza Residence / Migdal Arquitectos © Migdal Arquitectos Plaza Residence / Migdal Arquitectos © Migdal Arquitectos Plaza Residence / Migdal Arquitectos © Migdal Arquitectos plan 01 plan 01 plan 02 plan 02 plan 03 plan 03 section section

October 26 2010

14:00

Update: House 8 / BIG

© Julien Lanoo

Belgian photographer Julien Lanoo share with us his photoset of House 8, the latests project by danish architects BIG, featured last week here on ArchDaily.

More photographs after the break.

© Julien Lanoo

© Julien Lanoo

© Julien Lanoo

© Julien Lanoo

© Julien Lanoo

© Julien Lanoo

© Julien Lanoo

© Julien Lanoo

© Julien Lanoo

© Julien Lanoo

© Julien Lanoo

© Julien Lanoo

© Julien Lanoo

© Julien Lanoo

© Julien Lanoo

© Julien Lanoo

© Julien Lanoo

© Julien Lanoo

© Julien Lanoo

© Julien Lanoo

© Julien Lanoo

© Julien Lanoo

October 25 2010

15:00

Tree-ness House / Akihisa Hirata

Courtesy of Akihisa Hirata

Bridging the gap between nature and architecture, the Tokyo-based architecture office of Akihisa Hirata have designed an organic residential complex in Toshima-ku, Tokyo, Japan to break the typical layered architectural form seen very often in residential architecture. The result is very ambiguous interior and exterior spaces creating a more dynamic experience for its users. More images and architect’s description after the break.

Courtesy of Akihisa Hirata

The building’s program is a residential complex and tenant spaces located in Tokyo. The site has a narrow width and long depth, allowing for a narrow profile volume to be assumed from the condition. In contrast to typical layered architecture which only stacks floors, this design aims to create an organic layering system. The design includes objects which typical architecture doesn’t count in, such as exterior spaces and the street to generate spaces that are 3-dimensional. For example, much like a tree creates spaces in the air, the design creates a tangled space which is ambiguous in interior-exterior for the people.

Courtesy of Akihisa Hirata

By composing boxes, a layered volume with voids is created. Inside the boxes, there are closed spaces like bedrooms and outside boxes are for the terraces or open interior spaces enclosed by glass. Boxes have pleated openings and this allows the ambiguity of the inside-outside relationship. Around these pleats, greenery is planted and this creates 3-dimensional gardens on the perimeter of the building. The arrangement of functional volumes and voids, openings, and greenery tangles and integrates into an organic whole.

Courtesy of Akihisa Hirata

The design aims to develop the possibility of nature-like architecture in other projects too, but the design developed further more in this project. The trunk and leaves have a different appearance but the same quality in the foundation and this relationship creates an organic layering structure for architecture. The design releases this new architectural principle which is able to connect a complex ecosystem to the city.

Architect: Akihisa Hirata
Location: Toshima-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Structural engineers: Structural Design Office OAK
Mechanical engineers: EOS plus Co.,LTD / Comodo Co.,LTD
Principal use: residence, rental rooms, gallery
Site area: 138.7 m2
Building area: 112.0 m2
Total floor area: 409.3 m2
Structure: RC
Number of stories: 6 stories
Design period: January 2009 – present
Photographs: Courtesy of Akihisa Hirata

Tree-ness House Courtesy of Akihisa Hirata Tree-ness House Courtesy of Akihisa Hirata Tree-ness House Courtesy of Akihisa Hirata Tree-ness House Courtesy of Akihisa Hirata Tree-ness House Courtesy of Akihisa Hirata Tree-ness House Courtesy of Akihisa Hirata Tree-ness House Courtesy of Akihisa Hirata Tree-ness House Courtesy of Akihisa Hirata Tree-ness House Courtesy of Akihisa Hirata Tree-ness House Courtesy of Akihisa Hirata Tree-ness House Courtesy of Akihisa Hirata Tree-ness House Courtesy of Akihisa Hirata Tree-ness House Courtesy of Akihisa Hirata Tree-ness House Courtesy of Akihisa Hirata


03:00

Alp / Akihisa Hirata

© Toshiyuki Yano

Architects: Akihisa Hirata
Location: Kita, Tokyo, Japan
Site area: 294,02 sqm
Built area: 161,92 sqm
Total floor area: 499 sqm
Project Year: 2008-2010
Photographs: Toshiyuki Yano

diagram 01

© Toshiyuki Yano

This is housing project in Tokyo. We would like to rethink the architecture not as the act to produce an area like a box, but as a folded surface created by the movement of the ground. Here, the balance of the pressure between the inside and the outside produces the bumped walls or roofs, which creates one big volume with subtle division.

© Toshiyuki Yano

One can approach each house from exterior corridor, created by the dent of the volume. We can see the jostle between the inside and the outside in each rooms for example, the direct shape of roofs, diagonal protruding created by external stairs or distortion of the space by the folded walls.

first floor plan

second floor plan

third floor plan

Alp - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano Alp - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano Alp - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano Alp - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano Alp - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano Alp - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano Alp - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano Alp - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano elevation elevation first floor plan first floor plan roof plan roof plan second floor plan second floor plan section section situation plan situation plan third floor plan third floor plan diagram 01 diagram 01 diagram 02 diagram 02 diagram 03 diagram 03

October 20 2010

20:18

8 House / BIG

 Jens Lindhe

Celebrating its third project with the same development team in the maturing neighborhood of Orestad, the construction of the 61,000 sqm 8 House has come to an end, allowing people to bike all the way from the street up to its 10th level penthouses alongside terraced gardens where the first residents have already moved in.  Follow the break and you can find images of 8 House at night, interiors, gardens, and diagrams along with a more detailed project description and quotes from the architects.

Architect: BIG – Bjarke Ingels Group
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
Collaboration: Hopfner Partners, MOE & Brodsgaard, KLAR
Partner-In-Charge: Bjarke Ingels, Thomas Christoffersen
Project Leader: Ole Elkjaer-Larsen, Henrick Poulsen
Project Manager: Finn Norkjaer, Henrik Lund
Project Team: Dennis Rasmussen, Rune Hansen, Agustin Perez Torres, Annette Jensen, Carolien Schippers, Caroline Vogelius Wiener, Claus Tversted, David Duffus, Hans Larsen, Jan Magasanik, Anders Nissen, Christian Alvarez Gomez, Hjalti Gestsson, Johan Cool, James Duggan Schrader, Jakob Lange, Kirstine Ragnhild, Jakob Monefeldt, Jeppe Marling Kiib, Joost Van Nes, Kasia Brzusnian, Kasper Broendum Larsen, Louise Heboell, Maria Sole Bravo, Ole Nannberg, Pablo Labra, Pernille Uglvig Jessen, Peter Rieff, Peter Voigt Albertsen, Peter Larsson, Rasmus Kragh Bjerregaard, Richard Howis, Soeren Lambertsen, Eduardo Perez, Ondrej Tichy, Sara Sosio, Karsten Hammer Hansen, Christer Nesvik, Soeren Peter Kristensen, Lacin Karaoz, Marcello Cova, Luis Felipe González Delgado, Janghee Yoo, SunMing Lee
Client:
St. Frederikslund Holding
Project Area: 61,000 sqm, 476 residences
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Dragor Luft, Jens Lindhe, Ty Stange

 Jens Lindhe

The bowtie-shaped 61,000 sqm mixed-use building of three different types of residential housing and 10,000 sqm of retail and offices comprises Denmark’s largest private development ever undertaken. Commissioned by St. Frederikslund and Per Hopfner in 2006, the 8 House sits on the outer edge of the city as the southern most outpost of Orestad. Rather than a traditional block, the 8 House stacks all ingredients of a lively urban neighborhood into horizontal layers of typologies connected by a continuous promenade and cycling path up to the 10th floor creating a three-dimensional urban neighborhood where suburban life merges with the energy of a city, where business and housing co-exist.

“We have now completed three remarkable buildings in Orestad, the VM Houses, The Mountain and finally the 8 House – which is the sole result of a good and constructive collaboration with talented young architects who had a good understanding for the economical aspects,” Per Hopfner, Hopfner Partners

 Jens Lindhe

The 8 House creates two intimate interior courtyards, separated by the centre of the cross which houses 500 sqm of communal facilities available for all residents. At the very same spot, the building is penetrated by a 9 meter wide passage that allows people to easily move from the park area on its western edge to the water filled canals to the east. Instead of dividing the different functions of the building – for both habitation and trade – into separate blocks, the various functions have been spread out horizontally.

“The apartments are placed at the top while the commercial program unfolds at the base of the building. As a result, the different horizontal layers have achieved a quality of their own: the apartments benefit from the view, sunlight and fresh air, while the office leases merge with life on the street. This is emphasized by the shape of 8 House which is literally hoisted up in the Northeast corner and pushed down at the Southwest corner, allowing light and air to enter the southern courtyard,” Thomas Christoffersen, Partner in Charge, 8 House, BIG

 Jens Lindhe

A continuous public path stretches from street level to the penthouses and allows people to bike all the way from the ground floor to the top, moving alongside townhouses with gardens, winding through an urban perimeter block. Two sloping green roofs totaling 1,700 sqm are strategically placed to reduce the urban heat island effect as well as providing the visual identity to the project and tying it back to the adjacent farmlands towards the south.

“8 House is a three-dimensional neighborhood rather than an architectural object. An alley of 150 rowhouses stretches through the entire block and twists all the way from street level to the top and down again. Where social life, the spontaneous encounter and neighbor interaction traditionally is restricted to the ground level, the 8 House allows it to expand all the way to the top,” Bjarke Ingels, Founding Partner, BIG

 Ty Stange

The 8 House uses size to its advantage by creating immense differences in height thereby creating a unique sense of community with small gardens and pathways that remind you of the intimacy of an Italian hill town. With spectacular views towards the Copenhagen Canal and Kalvebod Faelled’s protected open spaces, 8 House provides residences to people in all of life’s stages through its 476 housing units, including apartments of varied sizes, penthouses and townhouses as well as office spaces to the city’s business and trade in one single building.

“8 House is our second realized example of architectural alchemy – the idea that by mixing traditional ingredients, retail, row- houses and apartments in untraditional ways – you create added value if not gold. The mix allows the individual activities to find their way to the most ideal location within the common framework – the retail facing street, the offices towards northern light and the residences with sun and views to the open spaces. 8 House is a perimeter block that morphs into a knot, twisting and turning to maximize the life quality of its many inhabitants,” Bjarke Ingels, Founding Partner, BIG

8 House / BIG  Dragor Luftfoto 8 House / BIG  Jens Lindhe 8 House / BIG  Jens Lindhe 8 House / BIG  Jens Lindhe 8 House / BIG  Jens Lindhe 8 House / BIG  Jens Lindhe 8 House / BIG  Jens Lindhe 8 House / BIG  Jens Lindhe 8 House / BIG  Jens Lindhe 8 House / BIG  Jens Lindhe 8 House / BIG  Jens Lindhe 8 House / BIG  Jens Lindhe 8 House / BIG  Jens Lindhe 8 House / BIG  Jens Lindhe 8 House / BIG  Jens Lindhe 8 House / BIG  Jens Lindhe 8 House / BIG  Jens Lindhe 8 House / BIG  Jens Lindhe 8 House / BIG  Jens Lindhe 8 House / BIG  Ty Stange diagram diagram diagram diagram diagram diagram diagram diagram diagram diagram diagram diagram diagram diagram diagram diagram diagram diagram diagram diagram diagram diagram diagram diagram
19:00

Songdo Landmark City Block A4 / REX


© Luxigon

Architect: REX
Location: Incheon, Korea
Client: Songdo Landmark City (SLC)
Program: Residential towers with a total of approximately 2,000 units, community facilities, retail, and underground parking
Area: 342,900 sqm
Project Status: Completed Concept Design
Landscape Architect: Bureau Bas Smets
Executive: HYUNDAI Architects & Engineers; SAMOO Architects & Engineers
Key Personel: Adolfo Albaisa, Haviland Argo, E. Sean Bailey, Keith Burns, Nicolas de Courten, Rob Daurio, Jeremiah Joseph, Hui Lee, Katharine Meagher, Clinton Miller, Roberto Otero, Michelle Petersen, Joshua Prince-Ramus, Jacob Reidel, Nikolas Rychen, Tal Schori, Hala Sheikh, Nuo Xu
Consultant: Magnusson Klemencic Associates

REX was asked to design a residential complex in Songdo Landmark City in which every apartment offers direct southern exposure, cross-ventilation, and views. However, Korean zoning guidelines and local building practices typically produce towers that fail to provide these three key, locally-prized amenities. Furthermore, prevailing site strategies carve up the open space such that the result is not the often-advertised “Towers in a Park,” but anemic “Towers in a Yard” instead.

Block A4 challenges conventional Korean development practices to provide the key amenities within each unit and a true publicly-accessible park at grade. Korean towers typically have four or more units per floor. As a result, many apartments have limited direct light, no southern exposure and poor cross-ventilation.

Courtesy of REX

By splitting a single tower with four units per floor into four separate towers with only one unit per floor, the resulting super-slim building type maximizes direct lighting and guarantees southern exposure for every unit, increases cross ventilation, increases views, and even increases ambient light.

In conventional four-unit towers, the structural core occupies the center of the floor plate. The small floor plate of a super-slim tower allows the structural core to become the tower perimeter. The resulting stiffened structural tube opens up the interior and eases space planning.

Surprisingly, the structural tube can be 50% perforated, as long as all openings are located to maintain continuous load paths and to minimize lateral displacement. The dynamic behavior of the perforated structural tube is well within acceptable standards.

© Magnusson Klemencic Associates

In Korea, gang-form construction is commonly used for the exterior walls and columns. Traditional concrete construction is used for interior bearing elements and floor plates.

As an alternative, by using Jump-up/Jack-down construction to build the perforated structural tube, it becomes possible to reduce the project build time by 63% compared to conventional gang-form construction methods.

The façade is designed to combine flexibility with a consistent image. Depending on the preferences of individual apartment owners, any given façade opening can be finished as a floor-to-ceiling window, an open-air balcony, or—with the use of a specially-designed manually operable window—an interior living space during cold months and a balcony during warm months.

The lobby of each tower occupies a double height space accessible from both grade and parking levels and provides daylight to below-grade community facilities.

Local zoning guidelines dictated that any windowed façade be separated from a facing neighboring building by a horizontal distance equal to the building’s height. In the case of a typical four-unit tower with windows on all sides, this rule would generate vast empty zones between towers unconducive to ground-level activity or community.

© Luxigon

However, as all of the super-slim tower’s services (including the single stair and elevator required by local code) are located to one side of the building, a single windowless façade per tower significantly increases site plan flexibility while maintaining privacy and views for the residents.

The prevailing Korean superblock site strategy carves up the open space at grade with a tangled network of hardscape paths. The resultant pockets of green space are residual in character and more akin to yards than park.

By organizing the landscape at grade into a series of continuous bands, SLC Block A4 presents an alternative site strategy that will provide an open, active, pedestrian-friendly park.

© Luxigon

All vehicle access and parking is placed below grade, and the towers are sited within the parking grid. At ground level, the towers create a diverse hierarchy of open spaces.

The primary pedestrian routes are consolidated into only four hardscape paths, avoiding a patchwork that would, on a site of this size, disperse and diffuse activity and divide up the green space.

Liberated from unnecessary interrupting paths, a genuine park of diverse landscape bands¬—capable of hosting a variety of public outdoor activities—is created across the site.

By threading the softscape and hardscape bands through a forest of super-slim 55-story towers with only one unit per floor, the resulting design for Songdo Landmark City Block A4 transforms Korean high-rise residential development.

Songdo Landmark City Block A4 / REX © Luxigon Songdo Landmark City Block A4 / REX Courtesy of REX Songdo Landmark City Block A4 / REX © Luxigon plan plan Songdo Landmark City Block A4 / REX © Luxigon Songdo Landmark City Block A4 / REX © Bureau Bas Smets Songdo Landmark City Block A4 / REX © Bureau Bas Smets Songdo Landmark City Block A4 / REX © Bureau Bas Smets Songdo Landmark City Block A4 / REX Courtesy of REX Songdo Landmark City Block A4 / REX Courtesy of REX Songdo Landmark City Block A4 / REX Courtesy of REX Songdo Landmark City Block A4 / REX Courtesy of REX Songdo Landmark City Block A4 / REX © Magnusson Klemencic Associates Songdo Landmark City Block A4 / REX Courtesy of REX Songdo Landmark City Block A4 / REXs © Magnusson Klemencic Associates Songdo Landmark City Block A4 / REX Courtesy of REX detail detail detail detail Songdo Landmark City Block A4 / REX Courtesy of REX Songdo Landmark City Block A4 / REX Courtesy of REX Songdo Landmark City Block A4 / REX Courtesy of REX Songdo Landmark City Block A4 / REX Courtesy of REX Songdo Landmark City Block A4 / REX Courtesy of REX
03:00

One Roof Apartment / Akihisa Hirata

© Toshiyuki Yano

Architects: Akihisa Hirata
Location: Niigata, Japan
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Toshiyuki Yano

diagram

Since there is a lot of snow in winter, terraces are not suitable. We wanted to create a huge roof for the house volumes, which can cover the common space protected from the cold weather.

© Toshiyuki Yano

© Toshiyuki Yano

plan 01

When the normal cubic volume diverges, a space will be formed in between and people feel welcomed by the warm and large space. The unique branched shape from the outside will symbolize as a comfortable place in a contemporary way.

One Roof Apartment - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano One Roof Apartment - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano One Roof Apartment - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano One Roof Apartment - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano One Roof Apartment - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano One Roof Apartment - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano One Roof Apartment - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano One Roof Apartment - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano One Roof Apartment - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano One Roof Apartment - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano One Roof Apartment - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano One Roof Apartment - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano One Roof Apartment - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano One Roof Apartment - Akihisa Hirata © Toshiyuki Yano plan 01 plan 01 plan 02 plan 02 plan 03 plan 03 plan 04 plan 04 section 01 section 01 section 02 section 02 diagram diagram

October 19 2010

17:00

Residential Building in Cagliari / Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects

© Giorgio Marturana

Architects: Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects
Location: Cagliari (Sardinia), Italy
Project Area: 3,000 sqm
Project Year: 2006-2010
Photographs: Giorgio Marturana

© Giorgio Marturana

The Bonaria quarter -in the south-east part of Cagliari- is an area characterized by an uneven topography and abundant housing developments which major part is dated from the fifties onwards. It is an area of fairly high natural elements (the hill of the Basilica of Bonaria) in a strong contrast with steep slopes overlooking the Mediterranean sea of the gulf of Cagliari. In such peculiar and privileged residential context, Dante O. Benini was asked to design another new vertical element featuring the city skyline in a strong manner.

© Giorgio Marturana

The high position of the building area allowed a research as an architectonic solution the emphasizes of the sea view, that becomes the principal planning element to which be attributed the utmost importance. Large windows are put in the day-area and protected from overhang balconies and sun-screens.

© Giorgio Marturana

The balconies have lengthen in the air until the utmost limit permission so that it is possible to enlarge, towards the outside, the built up areas. The south-west elevation will be characterized from an interactive facade in micro-perforated metal sheet for the radiating ventilation with function of solar screen to reduce in the lodging at the back. the excessive heat production.

© Giorgio Marturana

To protect the roofing and facilitate the heat dissipation, a radiating and ventilated micro-perforated sheet solar screen structure will be built and it will have also the support function for the photovoltaic panels of the electric power production.

All the façades will be covered with a special titanium dioxide photocatalic plaster to reduce the air noxious materials and preserves its steady look during the time, being polluting agents proof.

Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana Residential Building in Cagliari - Dante O. Benini & Partners Architects © Giorgio Marturana
14:00

Woodbridge12 Condominiums / SPF:a

© John Edward Linden

Architects: Studio Pali Fekete
Location: California, USA
Designer: Zoltan Pali
Project year: 2010
Photographs: John Edward Linden

© John Edward Linden

The Woodbridge12 condominium project represents the unique convergence of vision between architect and developer, and a passion on the part of both to see it come to fruition. In this case, the vision belonged to architect Zoltan Pali, FAIA of Studio Pali Fekete architects (SPF:a), and to developer, Elan Mordoch. Pali’s philosophy brought no particular design agenda to the table – a pure modernist, the architect allowed the site, program, and environmental constraints give shape to the building and its components, resulting in an efficient and poetic design solution. He is of the, “What does the building want to be?” school of architecture, and his dozens of prestigious design awards attest to his ability to answer that question with stunning and impressive results.

© John Edward Linden

Developer, Elan Mordoch, has spent his life studying both quality architecture and quality construction projects. With Woodbridge12 the developer was meticulous about expressing every architectural detail with a precision and build quality, typical of high end custom homes, but rarely seen on multi-family real estate developments. Finishes, products, and a myriad of carefully thought out unit features elevate the Woodbridge12 residences to some of the finest residential units available in Southern California.

Woodbridge12 Condominiums / Studio Pali Fekete © John Edward Linden Woodbridge12 Condominiums / Studio Pali Fekete © John Edward Linden Woodbridge12 Condominiums / Studio Pali Fekete © John Edward Linden Woodbridge12 Condominiums / Studio Pali Fekete © John Edward Linden Woodbridge12 Condominiums / Studio Pali Fekete © John Edward Linden Woodbridge12 Condominiums / Studio Pali Fekete © John Edward Linden Woodbridge12 Condominiums / Studio Pali Fekete © John Edward Linden Woodbridge12 Condominiums / Studio Pali Fekete © John Edward Linden Woodbridge12 Condominiums / Studio Pali Fekete © John Edward Linden ground floor unit plan ground floor unit plan typical ground floor plan typical ground floor plan typical unit plan typical unit plan

October 10 2010

03:00

Rue de la Convention Housing / Jean Paul Viguier Architecture

© Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre

Architects: Jean-Paul Viguier et Associés
Location: Paris, France
Architect project manager: Octave Parant
Architecte project leader: David Cisar
Team construction phase: Jean Blondel, Patrick Tavernier
Landscapes architects: Pierre-Henri Cazes, Benjamin Doré
Contractors: Paris-Habitat for 128 housings / Vinci for 78 housings
Technical consultant and economist: ARCOBA
Representative company: Bouygues Bâtiment
Project Area: 18,200 sqm
Budget: 20 M €
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre

plan 01

The plan layout is grouped to form a compact building entity, providing both a coherent base for environmental performance concepts and a reply to the insertion of the program within the existing site. The density of the resulting model frees up the garden area and the facade of the building behind.

© Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre

This ‘compacting’ of the building is the result of a study to optimise its volumetric constraints and orientation in order to gain a maximum of direct sunlight without penalising the existing neighbours. All apartments have a dual orientation which allows direct sunlight both morning and evening together with the additional comfort of cross-ventilation.

© Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre

The operation takes the form of a series of blocks of progressive height, linked by veranda type walkways. This principle generates a cascade of landscaped elements at the heart of the building. The blocks are organised around compact, day lit services and circulation cores thus avoiding the ‘staircase syndrome’.

elevation 01

A series of measures have been undertaken in respect of sustainable design to give the project its ‘HQE’ status.

Rue de la Convention Housing - Jean Paul Viguier Architecture © Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre Rue de la Convention Housing - Jean Paul Viguier Architecture © Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre Rue de la Convention Housing - Jean Paul Viguier Architecture © Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre Rue de la Convention Housing - Jean Paul Viguier Architecture © Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre Rue de la Convention Housing - Jean Paul Viguier Architecture © Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre Rue de la Convention Housing - Jean Paul Viguier Architecture © Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre Rue de la Convention Housing - Jean Paul Viguier Architecture © Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre Rue de la Convention Housing - Jean Paul Viguier Architecture © Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre site plan site plan plan 01 plan 01 plan 02 plan 02 plan 03 plan 03 elevation 01 elevation 01 elevations 02 elevations 02

October 09 2010

23:00

Stay Grounded / Materica Studio

Courtesy of Materica Studio

Italian architect Massimiliano Menegale shared with us his proposal for the SAIE Selection 2010, for which he received 2n prize ex aequo in its category. More images and architect’s description after the break.

Courtesy of Materica Studio

“STAY GROUNDED” is a project for a house which won’t steal the ground, won’t bite away another little piece of earth. It’s a proposal for a house lowered into the ground, and with a green roof. All the square meters used to build the inner spaces of the house are given back to nature in form of buried perimetral walls and green roof and garden. This way the temperature of the house is manteined at a constant level because of the partial burying of it. The house is also an answer to our present time, in which we all seem obsessed with appearance, showing off, being at the center of everything so that other people can watch us and admire us for a reason or another. Many of us don’ t want to live this way. Many prefer intimacy, private moments, avoiding that 1984’s Big Brother way of life of being constantly under surveillance or judgement. No windows on the external perimeter of the house, but an inner court that will give light and air to the whole house, granting maximum privacy and also a private inner garden to relax and sunbathe without curious eyes getting on our way. Also there are “light and air cannons” that will create a natural ventilation inside the house, providing a less energyvorous system.

Courtesy of Materica Studio

The house can be built in stacks, with “green energy hill” between a house and another; the little hills serve as an energy park, sporting photovoltaic cell panels and microaeolic generators. This way the houses should also be Energy-indipendent and share their part of self generated energy. Inside the hills there are also, buried down under, geotermic systems, allowing to introduce in the houses water and/or air at a constant temperature of 18/20 celsius degrees. This will enable a consistent lowering of the energetic needs to control the climate inside the houses.

The section exemplifies the way the house uses also passive solar energy contribution, and how the light cannons also serve as a passive ventilating sistem. The internal court and the green roof also contribute to lower the temperature of the areas in which the houses are built, enancing the quality of the microclimate.

Courtesy of Materica Studio

The house is studied also to have a good passive solar contribution, with ‘’wings’’ protruding from the house to provide protection at the same time against summer sunrays. The ‘’energetic section’’ shows the position of the sun in winter and summer. Also the presence of a seasonal tree in the inner private garden will help to have “leaves shadows” in the hot seasons, and in fall and winter the leaves will drop and let the sun come inside the house. As previously said, hot water for igienical uses and also winter heating are generated by the geothermical system, plus a high efficiency heat generator (pompa di calore a compressione), feeded by electrical energy, provided by the photovoltaic park built between the ground houses. The stratigrafy of roofs and walls is also studied to provide ideal thermic insulation in every season: the hills beside the houses provide a constant temperature outside the partially grounded walls, and the green roof also provides a perfect massive protection against the hot weather.

Courtesy of Materica Studio

In the area near Ferrara, Italy, where the houses were ideated to be built, there could be possibly some problems due to high percentage of radon gas in the underground. If the concentration would be major than 40 baquerel for m3 of air, then the solution would be either a 30 cm concrete continouos foundation, or a specific membrane (for example, DuPont has several specific products for this situation, also providing butilic adhesive for maximum security sealing).

The houses were studied to have an “A Class” Energy performance, but with a minimum use of petroleum-based insulation products.

Courtesy of Materica Studio

Architect: Materica Studio – Massimiliano Max Menegale
Location: Ferrara, Italy
House Area: 202.68 sqm
Gardens Area: 435.84 sqm
Energy hills Area: 544.05 sqm

matericastudio_maxmenegale08 Courtesy of Materica Studio matericastudio_maxmenegale09 Courtesy of Materica Studio matericastudio_maxmenegale11 Courtesy of Materica Studio matericastudio_maxmenegale10 Courtesy of Materica Studio matericastudio_maxmenegale14 Courtesy of Materica Studio matericastudio_maxmenegale13 Courtesy of Materica Studio matericastudio_maxmenegale12 Courtesy of Materica Studio matericastudio_maxmenegale07 Courtesy of Materica Studio matericastudio_maxmenegale06 Courtesy of Materica Studio matericastudio_maxmenegale05 Courtesy of Materica Studio matericastudio_maxmenegale04 Courtesy of Materica Studio matericastudio_maxmenegale03 Courtesy of Materica Studio matericastudio_maxmenegale02 Courtesy of Materica Studio matericastudio_maxmenegale01 Courtesy of Materica Studio
17:00

Social Housing in Paris / Frédéric Schlachet Architecte

© Frédéric Schlachet

Architect: Frédéric Schlachet Architecte
Location: Paris, France
Client: SNI – SAGI
General Contrator: AMT
Project Area: 1,650 sqm
Budget: 3,370,000 €
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Frédéric Schlachet

This project was initiated by the Paris hospitals group (AP-HP) with the aim of optimising its property development in the city programming a development including businesses and housing solutions for its staff. The development is attributed to SAGI for building and exploitation.

section

In this part of the 14th district in Paris there are disused quarries underground. The building has its foundations on 25m columns above underground galleries which have been filled in.

© Frédéric Schlachet

ground floor plan

The complex is situated behind an existing building which has been partially reconstructed and is set back from the road occupying an interior situation surrounded by other buildings. It shares an underground car park with a neighbouring building (by an extension) negating the need to create a separate access. It also benefits from a right to overlook neighbouring properties, instrumental (essential) for the volumetric aspect and the spatial organisation of the project.

© Frédéric Schlachet

The buildings are directed onto two gardens: one serving the general organisation and layout of the plot as a whole, the other ensuring an opening (including right to overlook neighbouring properties) and breaking from the pattern of gable walls that the other buildings present.

The ground floor constitutes a base, accommodating the commercial activity and the communal premises. The apartments are laid out over this base, their disposition taking into account the complex boundaries of the plot the restrictions relating to the neighbouring plots. Here, the architecture plays with volumes, with changing scales and empty spaces via which the flats, each one different, find their apertures, their viewpoints, their light.

© Frédéric Schlachet

The bare concrete, rough, stony or smooth is omnipresent. It is this material which allows the play of volumes and contrasts with the second layer of (created by) the windows, ironwork and smooth, abstract shutters.

Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet Social Housing in Paris - Frédéric Schlachet Architecte © Frédéric Schlachet situation situation site plan site plan ground floor plan ground floor plan first floor plan first floor plan second floor plan second floor plan third floor plan third floor plan fourth floor plan fourth floor plan section section

October 08 2010

03:00

Tribeca Loft / Fearon Hay Architects

© Richard Powers

Architect: Fearon Hay Architects
Location: Manhattan, New York, USA
Interior Collaborator: Penny Hay
Project Area: 550 sqm
Project Year: 2009
Photographs: Richard Powers

Located in the historic Green Industrial Building in Tribeca, is a recently completed 550sqm loft conversion – a bespoke and innovative response to the challenges of residing in Manhattan.

The existing 3.6m high space is defined by the exposed reinforced concrete frame and the large multi-paned windows offering panoramic views of the skyline on three sides.

axo 01

axo 02

The strategy was to provide the required division of space with minimum interference with the existing structure and maximum perception of the overall volume.

© Richard Powers

The insertion of steel framed, glazed volumes with raised timber floors provides elevated sleeping platforms within the loft space. The glazed volumes are accompanied by blank, white, volumes containing bathing, service and scullery functions. These service components are arranged in a linear sequence in the centre of the space.

Both of these insertions are carefully placed amongst the existing structural elements of columns, beams and corbels, freeing the structure and the perimeter of the loft from division.

© Richard Powers

floor plan

Further layering and configuration of the space is offered by layers of operable fabric screens and sliding panels. The various areas of the residence may be separated from one another or connected to each other as desired.

© Richard Powers

Collaborating with artisans of both New Zealand and New York has enabled the creation of custom fittings such as blown glass pendant lights, treated steel and freestanding stone washbasins and bath, resulting in a highly crafted and bespoke construction.

Tribeca Loft - Fearon Hay Architects © Richard Powers Tribeca Loft - Fearon Hay Architects © Richard Powers Tribeca Loft - Fearon Hay Architects © Richard Powers Tribeca Loft - Fearon Hay Architects © Richard Powers Tribeca Loft - Fearon Hay Architects © Richard Powers Tribeca Loft - Fearon Hay Architects © Richard Powers Tribeca Loft - Fearon Hay Architects © Richard Powers Tribeca Loft - Fearon Hay Architects © Richard Powers Tribeca Loft - Fearon Hay Architects © Richard Powers Tribeca Loft - Fearon Hay Architects © Richard Powers Tribeca Loft - Fearon Hay Architects © Richard Powers Tribeca Loft - Fearon Hay Architects © Richard Powers Tribeca Loft - Fearon Hay Architects © Richard Powers Tribeca Loft - Fearon Hay Architects © Richard Powers Tribeca Loft - Fearon Hay Architects © Richard Powers floor plan floor plan axo 01 axo 01 axo 02 axo 02 model 01 model 01 model 02 model 02

October 06 2010

12:00

Sugar Hill Housing / David Adjaye

© David Adjaye

David Adjaye’s new affordable housing building for Sugar Hill, Harlem is expected to strengthen the community with its mixed program on the base level and impvero the poverty-stricken neighborhood by providing quality housing for 124 families. In addition to apartments that will house some of the city’s poorest residents, a new educational, cultural and arts space will also be incorporated into the scheme. Resting at the bottom of Adjaye’s stacked and shifted volumes, the 18,000 sqf Faith Ringgold Children’s Museum of Art and Storytelling will hold a permanent exhibition of Ringgold’s quilt art in addition to temporary exhibitions. As bdonline.uk reported, “Ringgold, who grew up in the area, has developed the museum in order to provide local children with early education through art. The museum will, in particular, attempt to foster pride in Harlem’s own artistic legacy.” The building’s construction is projected for later this year.   We’re hoping this building has the potential to uplift a burdened community; what do you think?

October 05 2010

23:00

40 Housing Units / LAN Architecture

Courtesy of LAN Architecture

Paris-based LAN Architecture won the competition organized by ICF Novedis to design the block 4.2 of the new Cardinet-Chalabre urban development zone in Paris, France. More images and architect’s description after the break.

Courtesy of LAN Architecture

The major urban interest of Ilot 4.2 lies in its position: it will act as a fulcrum between Boulevard Pereire and the new ZAC (Urban Development Zone), creating a kind of transition between ‘black and white photograph’ Paris and the more extensive, three-dimensional city beyond.

Ensuring this transition was the core concern underlying our strategy, which involved trying to understand the fundaments of the Haussmanian typology.

We regard our proposal as a tribute to Paris, to an architecture defined by the city’s specificity and logic, but with the additional demand of having to provide solutions to current and emerging problems.

Courtesy of LAN Architecture

The project’s conception is based on the regularity of its façade. The interplay of matter and transparency defines the envelope of the ensemble, which for urban planning reasons has to take up the entire plot, and therefore have the same ground plan.

Each apartment is organised around a large loggia, an extension of the interior living space outside. In winter the loggia can be closed to create an additional living room, despite the cold. In summer the loggia helps ventilate the interior. The arrangement of the loggias creates an interplay between matter and transparency across the facade. Clad with wood, the loggias become its recognisable elements, enlivening the regularity of the windows, so that the building, seen from a distance, expresses itself from within, like a colour chart.

Courtesy of LAN Architecture

The regularity and size of the openings and the ceiling height render the building’s definition in terms of use ambiguous, and the choice of structure reinforces this. Only the facades and circulation core are load-bearing, leaving maximum freedom for the arrangement of each floor. The building can therefore change use in the future when required.

Architects: LAN Architecture
Location: Paris, France
Team: LAN (lead architect), Bollinger-Grohmann (structure), Agence Franck Boutté (HEQ consultant), LBE (fluids), Jp Tohier & Associes (surveyor)
Client: ICF Novedis
Project Area: 3200 m2
Budget: 5M € excl. VAT
Project Years: 2010-2013

LAN_SAUSSURE_BD_1 Courtesy of LAN Architecture LAN_SAUSSURE_BD_2 Courtesy of LAN Architecture LAN_SAUSSURE_BD_INT Courtesy of LAN Architecture LAN_SAUSSURE_BD_4 Courtesy of LAN Architecture LAN_SAUSSURE_BD_5 Courtesy of LAN Architecture LAN_SAUSSURE_BD_6 Courtesy of LAN Architecture LAN_SAUSSURE_BD_7 Courtesy of LAN Architecture LAN_SAUSSURE_BD_8 Courtesy of LAN Architecture LAN_SAUSSURE_BD_9 Courtesy of LAN Architecture LAN_SAUSSURE_BD_10 Courtesy of LAN Architecture LAN_SAUSSURE_BD_HQE Courtesy of LAN Architecture

October 01 2010

21:00

Albino Alligator / Maxwan

Courtesy of Maxwan

Architects: Maxwan
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Project Team: Nobuki Ogasahara, Artur Borejszo, Jason Hilgefort, Nara Lee, Michiel Raats, Rene Sangers
Client: NAi + Ymere + City of Amsterdam
Program: Housing, Office, Fitness, Public program, Park
Site Area: 17 ha
Total Floor Space: 8700 m2
Photographs: Courtesy of Maxwan

Courtesy of Maxwan

The Albino Alligator is a progressive live/work development to initiate Buiksloterham’s regeneration in Amsterdam North. It is named for its shape, materiality and its catalytic affect on the urban environment.

The Albino Alligator goes beyond standard mixed-use typologies. It proposes an intense mix of programs and environments and therefore a wide variety of uses. It is composed of five buildings: a workspace / public building (the head), a strip of row houses (the body), a residential tower (leg 1), an office tower (leg 2) and a fitness club (tail). Every building is shaped upon the spatial and structural needs of its specific program.

Courtesy of Maxwan

The buildings silver/grey appearance, composed of metal, concrete and glass, is inspired by the timeless industrial no-nonsense architecture in its surrounding. Choices are made for practical reasons: heat shielding, light gain, cost efficiency, low-environmental burden in the production process, durability and changeability.

Courtesy of Maxwan

The park is a “white-scape”. Gentle bumps create an atmosphere of ponds and dunes. The grainy surface allows the rain water to slowly soak into the ground, preventing rapid runoff, and optimizing biodiversity. The overall white treatment of the surface keeps the building and ground level air cool. It also reflects bright atmospheric light into the working and living spaces.

image197-03 Courtesy of Maxwan image197-01 Courtesy of Maxwan image197-02 Courtesy of Maxwan image197-04 Courtesy of Maxwan image197-05 Courtesy of Maxwan image197-07 Courtesy of Maxwan image197-08 Courtesy of Maxwan image197-09 Courtesy of Maxwan image197-10 Courtesy of Maxwan image197-11 Courtesy of Maxwan diagram197-01 Courtesy of Maxwan diagram197-02 Courtesy of Maxwan diagram197-03_copy Courtesy of Maxwan model197-01 Courtesy of Maxwan model197-02 Courtesy of Maxwan model197-03 Courtesy of Maxwan model197-04 Courtesy of Maxwan sketch197-01 Courtesy of Maxwan sketch197-02 Courtesy of Maxwan sketch197-03 Courtesy of Maxwan sketch197-04 Courtesy of Maxwan sketch197-06 Courtesy of Maxwan sketch197-07 Courtesy of Maxwan
17:00

Les Quais / Fabrice Dusapin

Architect: Fabrice Dusapin, architectes, urbanistes
Location: Ile de Nantes, Nantes, France
Client: PROMOGIM
Site area: 6,205 sqm
Built area: 11,800 sqm
Project year: 2010
Photographs: Stéphane Chalmeau

Designed by architect Fabrice Dusapin, this project complements the diversity of urban “quai François Mitterrand”, proposing building height and volumetric very different in rehabilitating an old house and constructing a residential building which includes the volumes of shed that existed. This large parcel now offers plots and alleys to leverage the views and access to the Loire.

floor plan

The project consists of four sets, the “maisons de ville”, the “Ateliers”, the “Central” and “Building”, which fit around a landscaped plaza that marks the heart of all and two footpaths provide a link between the platform and the street “Magin” and allow transparency to the visual stream.

The 6 « maisons de ville »

They share a common ground floor with the Central and together with him a single entity and are based on the profile of the former hangar permeability North-South Site. The ground floor consists of an entrance and a multipurpose room and the level of reference to R 1, is placed in the base receiving the car. These homes offer space day crossing on 2 levels (R 1 / R 2), with permeability street and indoor gardens with private terraces.

The “Central” and its base ground floor planted

3 blocks of 7 levels with duplexes are organized on a common body linear three levels, Wharf Street “Magin”. All accommodations are double direction, at least.

  • The plot dockside consists of 3 rooms open on the Loire.
  • The central plot, a set of overflow door overhang, each apartment offers views over the Loire.
  • The plot to the street line “Magin” offers a diversity of views, including the Loire, from its location at an angle to the device.

Most homes have thus both views on the Loire and a good natural sunlight. The ground floor consists of the halls of local activities towards B and trade on the platform, plus a portion of parking.

“The Building” and making up his garden in the ground

At the center of the device, its geometry is the result of the inflection of the quay at this level, and tapered path roads B and C. Based in the alignment of the pier, it offers a vast garden in the ground, heart block, which thus contribute to public space. It consists of 2 buildings (R 9 and R 6 duplexes) located so as to provide views on the Loire in each dwelling. At each current level, 3 units organized around a gallery of movement, and offering a caesura-through and a patio that identifies 2 buildings: one with R 9 to the east, in connection with the Palais de Justice, the other R 6 duplexes to the west, in relationship with the Central level.

The “Ateliers” and the courtyard open to the Loire

This is an identical reproduction of the existing volume preserved in its 3 dimensions, with the exception of the creation of a courtyard garden inside, allowing the organization U housing. The typical character of the existing hangar is maintained through the use of materials constituting the envelope of the current warehouse: foundation concrete formwork in gross board, clapboard facades of wood, accordion shutters and wood green roof. Housing (2 or 3 pieces) is served by 4 open stairwells, covered and ties between street and garden. The ground floor consists of homes along the path C and a car park accessible from the street Magin. This foundation receives and the garden planted on 80 cm of ground. All the ground level apartments have at least a double orientation. The accommodations on “Arthur III” street have distant views across the courtyard of the Palais de Justice.

Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau Les Quais - Fabrice Dusapin © Stéphane Chalmeau site plan site plan floor plan floor plan

September 30 2010

21:00

Garden City K66 / OFIS arhitekti

Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti

A couple of days ago we featured a project by Slovenian architects Enota, which received second prize in an invited competition. In that project, our readers asked for OFIS arhitekti’s proposal to the competition, so they shared it with us for you to enjoy. More images and architect’s description after the break.

Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti

The project proposes two layered volumes embracing the rich mix of different programs and distributed in:
-base of the volume as public programs and offices
-top floors as apartments

The tower strip steps up and down according to the urban height limits and form terraces-gardens.
Public Base volumes are separated and create open squares – dialog of external plaza with public programs and offices. Spaces are communicative, bright, fluid, and easily accessible and offer nice views and connections with surroundings: Strenia square, Park and roads.

Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti

10×10 MODULAR GRID – FLEXIBILITY
Both volumes are divided into modules, 10x10m in floor-plan. This is most sufficient modular grid for all programs (housing, public, office, service, and garage) and in this grid structure, façade panels and installation shafts are organized. Therefore plans and volumes are flexible and adaptable so distribution of programs can change according to the demands of investor or changes in the market-needs.

ECONOMIC AND OPERATIONAL FEASIBILITY
The proposal is based on the required surfaces from the brief. Due to its modular grid program distribution is flexible also the brief can be interchangeable and adaptable. Grid and modules repeat in apartments, public areas, offices, so it is possible to change, switch programs or insert new according to the changes on the market or investors needs. Distribution of vertical cores allows different organizations of plans – combinations of offices/programs within one or more floors. On the proposed grid leasable or saleable configuration can be organized.

Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti

EXTERNAL PLAZA
External plaza is space which connects all programs. This is light, fluid and airy space, partly covered and uncovered. It has opened views to park and the streets. It offers good accessibility to all the entrances of the complex and flows of people from the roads and the park. The plaza creates bright and communicative sheltered external space.

Covered public plaza in ground floor: 7.400
Opened public plaza in ground floor: 7.600
Internal office garden: 1.000
Strenia square: 6.200
Gardens on different levels: 9.200

The western part includes the tower which reaches up to 60 meters and has 18 floors.

Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti

BASE OF THE BUILDING – PUBLIC AND BUSINESS
The base of the building has four floors and is separated into 3 groups of program. Strenia square consists of 2 separate volumes with Gallery and Library. Floors have general height of 4.00 m net in ground-floor and 3.00 m in upper floors. Some spaces have double height of 6.50m net Plan and structure of both volumes is flexible so it allows also other programs such as offices, medical, shops or other services. Ground-floors are connected with external plaza and allow programs such as gallery shop or cafe in combination with reception, entry lobby and exhibition.

Volume and shape of the building is archived with simple rules:

The volume that is given by the urban regulation (building with tower of 60m) is cut with the grid of 10x10m.
Further on given program is distributed: public program in the base and housing on top.

Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti

Base is further cut into 3 volumes:

Strenia square host Library and Gallery; the third volume content is office program with internal patio garden.
Cut of the volumes allow perforated plaza that is airy, fluid and allows pedestrian flows.

Top floors – the height of the tower gently slopes down in terraces and creates garden patches of 100m2 and offers extra quality space to residents with natural light, ventilation and green outer space.

Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti

LIBRARY AND GALLERY
Library and gallery have internal connection with escalators or stairs. Accesses with elevators are separated for public and employees. Due to modularity it is easy to adapt the plan layout according to more detailed brief that will be elaborated in the future.

OFFICES
Offices are gathered around internal park so all spaces get maximum of natural light and natural ventilation. There are accessible by four cores. The shape and distribution of cores allows flexible occupancy. One floor can be shared by different owners and organized into separate units. It can be also connected for larger companies – both horizontally within the same floor or vertically in different levels. Shape and layout of the building allows different organization of floor: ocean type shared offices, single separate offices for 1 or 2 persons, meeting and presentation rooms etc…

Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti

VERTICAL CORES
There are 6 vertical cores distributed according to the program accessibility and fire protection rules. Each core includes 4 elevators, two for residents and two for public programs. Fire escape stairs are shared by all programs. Accesses to stairs and elevators are controlled so it is strictly controlled that uninvited guests can not enter to residential area or to business area. All elevators are accessible from level 0 and from underground. In upper levels from each core 2 of the elevators are opened in residential area and 2 in business area. Elevator entrances can also adapt differently according to the needs or be controlled with controlled card access. Business and public entrances to elevators in level 0 are from reception halls/lobbies. Entrances to apartment’s elevators are separated through residential entrance.

Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti

APARTMENTS
On top of the base there are 13 floors of apartments. Smaller apartment units are in lower 3 levels. Rooftop of this part is extending green roof that creates partly shared garden and partly private terraces.

Shared garden is connected with wellness, fitness, spa and pool and creates external exercise area. Access to this park is limited for residences and fitness visitors only. 10 top floors are rising in terraces so larger apartments gain quality of house with a garden. Here different type and sizes of apartments can be organized. Since the overall plan is modular grid apartment units can divide and merge. Apartments are flexible and allow different arrangements.

They all have external spaces (loggia, terrace or garden), large panoramic windows with external shading and stylish arrangement of spaces. Apartments have large living areas, large bedrooms with en-suite bathrooms.

Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti

Since volumes are stepping in terraces most apartments are in corner so they have windows and opened views to 2 or even 3 sides. They get maximum sun light, views and connection to its own garden. Apartments have quality of villas with private gardens with extra comfort; they are in the new city centre, they have direct access from the garage, direct access to wellness, services and shops positioned in the lower floors and since they are lifted – they gain spectacular views, sunlight and feeling of security. We propose top floor to host public program: restaurant, fitness/spa – but it can be also easily adapted into apartments.

Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti

CONCEPT – PART SOUTH
The southern part follows similar concept with base and roof-terraces that reaches up to 27m. Ground-floor has public programs (shop, medical shop, pharmacy) end entrance lobby-s. Three floors of the base are medical centre. Spaces are flexible and distributed in a way that allow different organization: space can be rented to various doctors, with the use of common services and facilities. The clinic can be organized as a multidisciplinary selection of various day services: sports medicine, eye surgery, physiotherapists, plastic surgery, dentistry, etc. The clinic also includes operating theatre and post-operative intensive care unit. Top 4 floors are apartments. Smaller units are in lower floors. Most of the units have terraces-gardens and are opened on 2 or 3 sides. Shape and terraces are positioned in a way that offer opened views, maximum sun and daylight and natural ventilation. Level 0 has plaza with combination of intern al garden. It is well ventilated, light and creates pedestrian flows and easy access to all premises.

Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti

GARAGE AND TRAFFIC SOLUTION:
Both volumes have underground in 2 levels that are connected under the street. Here parking, storages and technical spaces are organized. There are two entrance/exit ramps to the garage, one along southern and other along western part. Rams are on the roads that are suggested by IPN. All vertical cores with staircases and elevators are accessible from the garage. Entrances for visitors, employees and residences can be controlled by card. There is also extra public access possible to the Strenia square. Garage is planned in a way that allows phase development and building in 2 parts (west and south).

Garage:
Brutto surface: 48.200
No. of parking spaces: 1650
No. of storages 222:

Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti

SUSTAINABILITY – LEED “GOLD” CERTIFIED
Basic principles of sustainability are generating volume of the building.

Apartments and terraces:
Terraces are creating apartments with maximum daylight, sunlight and cross natural ventilation. Each apartment has openings to 2 or 3 sides and external shading device, which gives most sufficient sun-protection and creates privacy. Large terraces with rich vegetation will create cool effect in summer. They will have removable textile roof shading for shadow and rain protection. Smaller apartment units in lower floors have loggias that create similar effect in smaller scale. Also these units have external shading.

Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti

Offices:
Offices and medical centre are generated around internal courtyard/park. That provides spaces that have natural light and natural cross ventilation and provide friendly and eco working environment. Plans are not deep. Distribution of vertical cores allows different arrangements of plans and flexibility.

External spaces:
Plaza on level +0 is well ventilated, opened, with natural light and allows pedestrian flows and good orientation.
It is combined with green and water features which creates cool and friendly environment. Green roofs, gardens and terraces produce direct contact to external environment to all; residents, employees and visitors and create friendly and green quality.

Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti

Compact volume and program mix
Compact volume and program mix of living/working/service minimizes transport needs. Compact volume produces low energy consumptions and reduces energy waste. External shading and textile removable roofs above gardens produce maximum sun-protection.

Sufficient bruto/netto
Netto selling/renting surface in relation to the brutto respects rationality and high – luxurious level that building has to achieve. Minimum number of vertical cores is planed in relation to the rules of fire-escape and good comfort. Staircases are shared between different users but can be controlled with card.

We propose bicycle storages, changing rooms, garage spaces for electrical and Smart cars. We propose 2 parking per flat, no more for keeping better environment. Vegetation that needs no extra watering will be chosen. We propose rain water collecting and re-usage and elements such as low-water usage toilets and showers. We propose photo-voltaic panels on some roofs and surfaces.

Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti

MATERIALS
Since the volume creates unique form the façade materials can be simple. Base of the building has glazed façade – this is combination of transparent glass with internal shading. The glass is light colored with laminated metal mesh in between The facade raster is 1.00m and is modular for both – offices and apartments. The raster allows different organizations of walls behind the facade. Apartment’s façade have large panoramic sliding windows with external shading (silver alu perforated metal blinds). Textile removable roofs (tends) will cover the gardens.

Offices have double floor and suspended ceiling to achieve maximum flexibility of plan organization. Terraces have wooden floor, wood and natural stone is also planed in the apartments. Offices will have floor finishing in textile or wood.

GARDEN CITY K66_01 Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti GARDEN CITY K66_02 Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti GARDEN CITY K66_04 Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti GARDEN CITY K66_05 Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti GARDEN CITY K66_05_ Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti GARDEN CITY K66_06 Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti GARDEN CITY K66_06_ Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti GARDEN CITY K66_07 Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti GARDEN CITY K66_08 Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti GARDEN CITY K66_09 Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti GARDEN CITY K66_10 Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti GARDEN CITY K66_12 Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti GARDEN CITY K66_14 Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti 03_diagram-modular system_prototypes Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti 01_diagram-modules_western part Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti 00_diagram-modules_southern part Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti elevations Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti SITE PLAN Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti SOUTHERN PART_apartment stripe Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti SOUTHERN PART_base_medical clinic Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti WESTERN PART_apartment stripe_5-11 floor Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti WESTERN PART_apartment stripe_12-17 floor Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti WESTERN PART_base_library-museum_offices Courtesy of OFIS arhitekti

September 28 2010

21:00

Lotus Towers / Enota

Courtesy of Enota

Slovenian architects Enota shared with us  “Lotus Towers”, a 64,100 m2 housing project in Ljubljana, for which they received second prize in an invited competition. More images and architect’s description after the break.

Courtesy of Enota

The carrying quality of the building site is no doubt the new city park. As it is evident from related cases around the world, apartment buildings in this type of location with apartments overlooking the park are especially wanted, since the park greatly increases the quality of living by creating a mild microclimate. Thus building is not divided into primary and secondary apartments but they all have a direct view of the park. In order to achieve the uninterrupted view of the park, the apartments were laid out in the split lamella, that is 60 meters high, which is the maximum height allowed according to the urban regulations and 15 meters wide, which is the maximum depth that allows good lighting for the double-sided oriented apartments. Splitting the lamella in two parts allows sunlight that falls to resident’s wellness area placed on the roof of public program volume, to be equally distributed between the morning and the afternoon.

Courtesy of Enota

Double-sided orientation of apartments is very important in providing an effective sustainable scheme. Due to the specifics regarding use, it is more difficult to subject the apartments to technological control of energy efficiency than the public program. One of the more important conditions for achieving high sustainable performance is good natural ventilation, which is achieved easiest by having double sided apartments for cross ventilation. The double-sided orientation of the apartment buildings also allows views for the residents on all sides, long and open internal views and creates a greater sense of spaciousness.

Courtesy of Enota

The volume of the public program below is also designed to be in constant connection to the park. The inclination of outer walls of entire lower volume creates jutting roof over the entrances around entire edge of the building. At the same time people do not have the sense that they are standing under a roof due to the height of the edge of the flange. Cutting and opening the volume further inside allows for daylight to enter deep into the facility and opens a path for natural ventilation also on the ground floor of the public program. The incision system is designed in such a way so that the natural light penetrates throughout the entire depth of the public program volume. The ground floor of the building becomes a kind of opened covered plaza with entrances to diverse public program. A new city loggia.

LOTUS TOWERS renderji 02 Courtesy of Enota LOTUS TOWERS renderji 02 Courtesy of Enota LOTUS TOWERS renderji 02 Courtesy of Enota LOTUS TOWERS renderji 02 Courtesy of Enota LOTUS TOWERS renderji 02 Courtesy of Enota LOTUS TOWERS renderji 02 Courtesy of Enota K66 nacti Courtesy of Enota K66 nacti Courtesy of Enota K66 nacti Courtesy of Enota K66 nacti Courtesy of Enota K66 nacti Courtesy of Enota K66 nacti Courtesy of Enota LOTUS TOWERS western nacti 07 Courtesy of Enota LOTUS TOWERS western nacti 07 Courtesy of Enota K66 nacti Courtesy of Enota LOTUS TOWERS western nacti 07 Courtesy of Enota LOTUS TOWERS western nacti 07 Courtesy of Enota K66 nacti Courtesy of Enota LOTUS TOWERS western nacti 07 Courtesy of Enota LOTUS TOWERS western nacti 07 Courtesy of Enota K66 nacti Courtesy of Enota LOTUS TOWERS western nacti 07 Courtesy of Enota LOTUS TOWERS western nacti 07 Courtesy of Enota LOTUS TOWERS western nacti 07 Courtesy of Enota LOTUS TOWERS western nacti 07 Courtesy of Enota LOTUS TOWERS western nacti 07 Courtesy of Enota K66 nacti Courtesy of Enota LOTUS TOWERS western nacti 07 Courtesy of Enota
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